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strx25 Manual

Description: OpenSS7 Online Manuals

A PDF version of this document is available here.

OpenSS7 X.25 Networking

OpenSS7 X.25 Networking Installation and Reference Manual

About This Manual

This is Edition 1, last updated 2008-10-31, of The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking Installation and Reference Manual, for Version 0.9.2 release 1 of the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package.

Preface

Notice

This package is released and distributed under the AGPL (see GNU Affero General Public License). Please note, however, that there are different licensing terms for the manual pages and some of the documentation (derived from OpenGroup1 publications and other sources). Consult the permission notices contained in the documentation for more information.

This manual is released under the FDL (see GNU Free Documentation License) with no sections invariant.

Abstract

This manual provides a Installation and Reference Manual for OpenSS7 X.25 Networking.

Objective

The objective of this manual is to provide a guide for the STREAMS programmer when developing STREAMS modules, drivers and application programs for OpenSS7 X.25 Networking.

This guide provides information to developers on the use of the STREAMS mechanism at user and kernel levels.

STREAMS was incorporated in UNIX System V Release 3 to augment the character input/output (I/O) mechanism and to support development of communication services.

STREAMS provides developers with integral functions, a set of utility routines, and facilities that expedite software design and implementation.

Intent

The intent of this manual is to act as an introductory guide to the STREAMS programmer. It is intended to be read alone and is not intended to replace or supplement the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking manual pages. For a reference for writing code, the manual pages (see STREAMS(9)) provide a better reference to the programmer. Although this describes the features of the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package, OpenSS7 Corporation is under no obligation to provide any software, system or feature listed herein.

Audience

This manual is intended for a highly technical audience. The reader should already be familiar with Linux kernel programming, the Linux file system, character devices, driver input and output, interrupts, software interrupt handling, scheduling, process contexts, multiprocessor locks, etc.

The guide is intended for network and systems programmers, who use the STREAMS mechanism at user and kernel levels for Linux and UNIX system communication services.

Readers of the guide are expected to possess prior knowledge of the Linux and UNIX system, programming, networking, and data communication.

Revisions

Take care that you are working with a current version of this manual: you will not be notified of updates. To ensure that you are working with a current version, contact the Author, or check The OpenSS7 Project website for a current version.

A current version of this manual is normally distributed with the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package, strx25-0.9.2.1.2

Version Control

     strx25.texi,v
     Revision 0.9.2.4  2008-09-20 11:04:41  brian
     - added package patchlevel
     
     Revision 0.9.2.3  2008-08-03 06:03:41  brian
     - protected agains texinfo commands in log entries
     
     Revision 0.9.2.2  2008/07/27 08:49:53  brian
     - no invariant sections, more libtool ignores
     
     Revision 0.9.2.1  2008-05-03 10:46:37  brian
     - added package files

ISO 9000 Compliance

Only the TeX, texinfo, or roff source for this manual is controlled. An opaque (printed, postscript or portable document format) version of this manual is an UNCONTROLLED VERSION.

Disclaimer

OpenSS7 Corporation disclaims all warranties with regard to this documentation including all implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, non-infringement, or title; that the contents of the manual are suitable for any purpose, or that the implementation of such contents will not infringe on any third party patents, copyrights, trademarks or other rights. In no event shall OpenSS7 Corporation be liable for any direct, indirect, special or consequential damages or any damages whatsoever resulting from loss of use, data or profits, whether in an action of contract, negligence or other tortious action, arising out of or in connection with any use of this manual or the performance or implementation of the contents thereof.

OpenSS7 Corporation reserves the right to revise this software and documentation for any reason, including but not limited to, conformity with standards promulgated by various agencies, utilization of advances in the state of the technical arts, or the reflection of changes in the design of any techniques, or procedures embodied, described, or referred to herein. OpenSS7 Corporation is under no obligation to provide any feature listed herein.

U.S. Government Restricted Rights

If you are licensing this Software on behalf of the U.S. Government ("Government"), the following provisions apply to you. If the Software is supplied by the Department of Defense ("DoD"), it is classified as "Commercial Computer Software" under paragraph 252.227-7014 of the DoD Supplement to the Federal Acquisition Regulations ("DFARS") (or any successor regulations) and the Government is acquiring only the license rights granted herein (the license rights customarily provided to non-Government users). If the Software is supplied to any unit or agency of the Government other than DoD, it is classified as "Restricted Computer Software" and the Government's rights in the Software are defined in paragraph 52.227-19 of the Federal Acquisition Regulations ("FAR") (or any successor regulations) or, in the cases of NASA, in paragraph 18.52.227-86 of the NASA Supplement to the FAR (or any successor regulations).

Acknowledgements

As with most open source projects, this project would not have been possible without the valiant efforts and productive software of the Free Software Foundation and the Linux Kernel Community.

Sponsors

Funding for completion of the OpenSS7 OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package was provided in part by:

OpenSS7 Corporation

Additional funding for The OpenSS7 Project was provided by:

OpenSS7 Corporation
Lockheed Martin Co.
Motorola
HOB International
Comverse Ltd.
Sonus Networks Inc.
France Telecom
SS8 Networks Inc.
Nortel Networks
Verisign
eServGlobal (NZ) Pty Ltd.
NetCentrex S. A.
SysMaster Corporation
GeoLink SA
AirNet Communications
TECORE
Tumsan Oy
Vodare Ltd.
Excel Telecommunications

Contributors

The primary contributor to the OpenSS7 OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is Brian F. G. Bidulock. The following is a list of significant contributors to The OpenSS7 Project:

− Per Berquist
− John Boyd
− Chuck Winters
− Peter Courtney
− Tom Chandler
− Gurol Ackman
− Kutluk Testicioglu
− John Wenker
− Others

Authors

The authors of the OpenSS7 OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package include:

Brian Bidulock

See Author Index, for a complete listing and cross-index of authors to sections of this manual.

Maintainer

The maintainer of the OpenSS7 OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is:

Brian Bidulock

Please send bug reports to bugs@openss7.org using the send-pr script included in the package, only after reading the BUGS file in the release, or See Problem Reports.

Web Resources

The OpenSS7 Project provides a website dedicated to the software packages released by the OpenSS7 Project.

Bug Reports

Please send bug reports to bugs@openss7.org using the send-pr script included in the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package, only after reading the BUGS file in the release, or See Problem Reports. You can access the OpenSS7 GNATS database directly via the web, however, the preferred method for sending new bug reports is via mail with the send-pr script.

Mailing Lists

The OpenSS7 Project provides a number of general discussion Mailing Lists for discussion concerning the OpenSS7 OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package as well as other packages released by The OpenSS7 Project.

These are mailman mailing lists and so have convenient web interfaces for subscribers to control their settings. See http://www.openss7.org/mailinglist.html.

The mailing lists are as follows:

openss7
The openss7 mailing list is for general enquiries, information exchange and announcements regarding the OpenSS7 Project. This is our original mailing list and takes the highest amount of traffic.
openss7-announce
The openss7-announce mailing list is for announcements related to the OpenSS7 Project. This list will accept announcements posted by subscribers. Subscribe to this list if you are interested in announcements from the OpenSS7 Project, subscribers and sponsors, related to the OpenSS7 Project or STREAMS, SS7, SIGTRAN or SCTP in general.
openss7-cvs
The openss7-cvs mailing list is for automatic CVS log reporting. You must get permission of the owner to subscribe to this list. Subscribers are not allowed to post to this list, this is merely for distributing notification of changes to the CVS repository.h
openss7-develop
The openss7-develop mailing list is for email exchange related to the development projects under the OpenSS7 Project. This includes development requests, proposals, requests for comment or proposal. Subscribe to this list if you are interested in ongoing development details regarding the OpenSS7 Project.
openss7-test
The openss7-test mailing list is for email exchange related to the testing of code under the OpenSS7 Project. This specifically relates to conformance testing, verification testing, interoperability testing and beta testing. Subscribe to this list if you are interested in participating in and receiving ongoing details of test activities under the OpenSS7 Project.
openss7-bugs
The openss7-bugs mailing list is specifically tailored to bug tracking. The mailing list takes a feed from the OpenSS7 GNATS bug tracking system and accepts posting of responses to bug reports, tracking and resolution. Subscribe to this list if you are interested in receiving detailed OpenSS7 release code bug tracking information. This list is not archived; for historical information on problem reports, see our GNATS databases.
openss7-updates
The openss7-updates mailing list provides updates on OpenSS7 Project code releases and ongoing activities. Subscribers are not allowed to post to this list; this list is for official OpenSS7 Project announcements only. Subscribe to this list if you are interested in receiving updates concerning official releases and activities of the OpenSS7 Project.
openss7-streams
The openss7-streams mailing list is for email exchange related to the STREAMS development projects under the OpenSS7 Project. This includes development requests, proposals, requests for comment or proposal. Subscribe to this list if you are interested in ongoing development details regarding the OpenSS7 Project STREAMS components.
linux-streams
The linux-streams mailing list is for mail exchange related to Linux Fast-STREAMS or Linux STREAMS. This includes patches, development requests, proposals, requests for comment or proposal. Subscribe to this list if you are interested in ongoing development details regarding the STREAMS for Linux components. This is the the new (September 2006) home of the linux-streams list formerly of <gsyc.escet.urjc.es>.
Spam

To avoid spam being sent to the members of the OpenSS7 mailing list(s), we have blocked mail from non-subscribers. Please subscribe to the mailing list before attempting to post to them. (Attempts to post when not subscribed get bounced.)

As an additional measure against spam, subscriber lists for all OpenSS7 mailing lists are not accessible to non-subscribers; for most lists subscriber lists are only accessible to the list administrator. This keeps your mailing address from being picked off our website by bulk mailers.

Acceptable Use Policy

It is acceptable to post professional and courteous messages regarding the OpenSS7 package or any general information or questions concerning STREAMS, SS7, SIGTRAN, SCTP or telecommunications applications in general.

Large Attachments

The mailing list is blocked from messages of greater than 40k. If you have attachments (patches, test programs, etc.) and you mail them to the list, it will bounce to the list administrator. If you are interested in making your patches, test programs, test results or other large attachments available to the members of the mailing list, state in the message that you would like them posted and the list administrator will place them in the mail archives.

Quick Start Guide

OpenSS7 X.25 Networking

Package strx25-0.9.2.1 was released under AGPLv3 2008-10-31.

OpenSS7 X.25 Networking (strx25) is an OpenSS7 Project implementation of various X.25 networking components for Linux Fast-STREAMS.

This release is the first separate release of the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package. Some of the components in this package were formerly present in the strss7 package. Various networking drivers are provided as well as CDI, DLPI, NPI, TPI and XTI header files for X.25 operation. The package contains the necessary manual pages and other documentation for X.25 components in a separate autoconf tarball.

The package uses the following standard Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) conforming header files from the strxns package:

<sys/cdi.h> Communications Device Interface
<sys/dlpi.h> Data Link Provider Interface Revision 2.0.0
<sys/npi.h> Network Provider Interface Revision 2.0.0

The package uses the following standard Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) conforming header files from the strxnet package:

<sys/tihdr.h> Transport Provider Interface Revision 2.0.0

The package currently includes the following STREAMS kernel modules and drivers:

streams_x223.ko /dev/cons
streams_x233.ko /dev/clns
streams_x224.ko /dev/tp0 /dev/tp4
streams_X234.ko /dev/clts
streams_isot.ko module /dev/isot
streams_lpp.ko module /dev/lpp
streams_cmot.ko module /dev/cmot
streams_itot.ko module
streams_itos.ko module
  • x223(4) driver provides CONS and CLNS services in accordance with the ISO/OSI Network Protocol X.223;
  • x224(4) driver provides OSI Transport Protocol services in accordance with the ISO/OSI Transport Protocol X.224;
  • isot(4) driver and module provides ISO Transport over TCP/IP as specified in RFC 1006/STD 35;
  • lpp(4) driver and module provides ISO Transport over TCP/IP as specified in RFC 1085;
  • cmot(4) driver and modules provides ISO Common Management Information Protocol (CMIP) over TCP/IP as specified in RFC 1095;
  • itot(4) module provides ISO Transport over TCP as specified in RFC 2126; and,
  • itos(4) module provides ISO Transport over SCTP.

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package includes kernel modules, SVR 4.2 STREAMS drivers, modules, libraries, utilities, test programs, daemons, and development environment for the development and execution of X/Open Network Services (ISO) protocol stack components and applications for the SVR 4.2 STREAMS environment.

This distribution is only currently applicable to Linux 2.4 and 2.6 kernels and was targeted at ix86, x86_64, ppc and ppc64 architectures, but should build and install for other architectures as well.

Release

This is the strx25-0.9.2.1 package, released 2008-10-31. This ‘0.9.2.1’ release, and the latest version, can be obtained from the download area of The OpenSS7 Project website using a command such as:

     $> wget http://www.openss7.org/tarballs/strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2

The release is available as an autoconf(1) tarball, src.rpm or dsc, as a set of binary rpms or debs, or as a yum(8) or apt(8) repository. See the download page for the autoconf(1) tarballs, src.rpms, dscs, or repository access instructions. See the strx25 package page for tarballs, source and binary packages.

Please see the NEWS file for release notes and history of user visible changes for the current version, and the ChangeLog file for a more detailed history of implementation changes. The TODO file lists features not yet implemented and other outstanding items.

Please see the INSTALL, INSTALL-strx25 and README-make, files (or see Installation) for installation instructions.

When working from cvs(1) or git(1), please see the README-cvs, file (or see Downloading from CVS). An abbreviated installation procedure that works for most applications appears below.

This release of the package is published strictly under Version 3 of the GNU Affero Public License which can be found in the file COPYING. Package specific licensing terms (if any) can be found in the file LICENSES. Please respect these licensing arrangements. If you are interested in different licensing terms, please contact the copyright holder, or OpenSS7 Corporation <sales@openss7.com>.

See README-alpha (if it exists) for alpha release information.

Prerequisites

2.6.26exinfo -*- vim: ft=texinfo

The quickest and easiest way to ensure that all prerequisites are met is to download and install this package from within the OpenSS7 Master Package, openss7-0.9.2.G, instead of separately.

Prerequisites for the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package are as follows:

  1. Linux distribution, somewhat Linux Standards Base compliant, with a 2.4 or 2.6 kernel and the appropriate tool chain for compiling out-of-tree kernel modules. Most recent Linux distributions are usable out of the box, but some development packages must be installed. For more information, see Compatibility.

    − A fairly LSB compliant GNU/Linux distribution.3
    − Linux 2.4 kernel (2.4.10 - 2.4.27), or
    − Linux 2.6 kernel (2.6.3 - 2.6.26);
    − glibc2 or better.
    − GNU groff (for man pages).4
    − GNU texinfo (for info files).
    − GNU bison and flex (for config programs).
    − net-snmp (for SNMP agents).5

(Note: If you acquired strx25 a part of the OpenSS7 Master Package, then the dependencies listed below will already have been met by unpacking the master package.)

  1. OpenSS7 Linux Fast-STREAMS, streams-0.9.2.4. 6
  2. OpenSS7 STREAMS Compatibility Modules, strcompat-0.9.2.7.
  3. OpenSS7 STREAMS XNS, strxns-0.9.2.7.
  4. OpenSS7 STREAMS XTI/TLI, strxnet-0.9.2.12.
  5. OpenSS7 STREAM Network Services Library, strnsl-0.9.2.4. (Optional.)
  6. OpenSS7 STREAMS Sockets, strsock-0.9.2.4. (Optional.)
  7. OpenSS7 STREAMS INET, strinet-0.9.2.7.
  8. OpenSS7 STREAMS SCTP, strsctp-0.9.2.9.
  9. OpenSS7 STREAMS Channels, strchan-0.9.2.4.

When configuring and building multiple OpenSS7 Project release packages, place all of the source packages (unpacked tarballs) at the same directory level and all build directories at the same directory level (e.g. all source packages under /usr/src).

When installing packages that install as kernel modules, it is necessary to have the correct kernel development package installed. For the following distributions, use the following commands:

     Ubuntu:  $> apt-get install linux-headers
     Debian:  $> apt-get install kernel-headers
     Fedora:  $> yum install kernel-devel

You also need the same version of gcc(1) compiler with which the kernel was built. If it is not the default, add ‘CC=kgcc’ on the line after ‘./configure’, for example:

     $> ../strx25-0.9.2.1/configure CC='gcc-3.4'

Installation

The following commands will download, configure, build, check, install, validate, uninstall and remove the package:

     $> wget http://www.openss7.org/tarballs/strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2
     $> tar -xjvf strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2
     $> mkdir build
     $> pushd build
     $> ../strx25-0.9.2.1/configure --enable-autotest
     $> make
     $> make check
     $> sudo make install
     $> sudo make installcheck
     $> sudo make uninstall
     $> popd
     $> sudo rm -rf build
     $> rm -rf strx25-0.9.2.1
     $> rm -f strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2

If you have problems, try building with the logging targets instead. If the make of a logging target fails, an automatic problem report will be generated that can be mailed to The OpenSS7 Project.7 Installation steps using the logging targets proceed as follows:

     $> wget http://www.openss7.org/tarballs/strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2
     $> tar -xjvf strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2
     $> mkdir build
     $> pushd build
     $> ../strx25-0.9.2.1/configure --enable-autotest
     $> make compile.log
     $> make check.log
     $> sudo make install.log
     $> sudo make installcheck.log
     $> sudo make uninstall.log
     $> popd
     $> sudo rm -rf build
     $> rm -rf strx25-0.9.2.1
     $> rm -f strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2

See README-make for additional specialized make targets.

For custom applications, see the INSTALL and INSTALL-strx25 files or the see Installation, as listed below. If you encounter troubles, see Troubleshooting, before issuing a bug report.

Brief Installation Instructions

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is available from the downloads area of The OpenSS7 Project website using a command such as:

     $> wget http://www.openss7.org/tarballs/strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2

Unpack the tarball using a command such as:

     $> tar -xjvf strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2

The tarball will unpack into the relative subdirectory named after the package name: strx25-0.9.2.1.

The package builds using the GNU autoconf utilities and the configure script. To build the package, we recommend using a separate build directory as follows:

     $> mkdir build
     $> cd build
     $> ../strx25-0.9.2.1/configure

In general, the package configures and builds without adding any special options to the configure script. For general options to the configure script, see the GNU INSTALL file in the distribution:

     $> less ../strx25-0.9.2.1/INSTALL

For specific options to the configure script, see the INSTALL-strx25 file in the distribution, or simply execute the configure script with the --help option like so:

     $> ../strx25-0.9.2.1/configure --help

After configuring the package, the package can be compiled simply by issuing the ‘make’ command:

     $> make

Some specialized makefile targets exists, see the README-make file in the distribution or simply invoke the ‘help’ target like so:

     $> make help | less

After successfully building the package, the package can be checked by invoking the ‘check’ make target like so:

     $> make check

After successfully checking the package, the package can be installed by invoking the ‘install’ make target (as root) like so:

     $> sudo make install

The test suites that ship with the package can be invoked after the package has been installed by invoking the ‘installcheck’ target. This target can either be invoked as root, or as a normal user, like so:

     $> make installcheck

(Note: you must add the --enable-autotest flag to configure, above for the test suites to be invoked with ‘make installcheck’.)

The package can be cleanly removed by invoking the ‘uninstall’ target (as root):

     $> sudo make uninstall

Then the build directory and tarball can be simply removed:

     $> cd ..
     $> rm -rf build
     $> rm -rf strx25-0.9.2.1
     $> rm -f strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2

Detailed Installation Instructions

More detailed installation instructions can be found in the Installation, contained in the distribution in ‘text’, ‘info’, ‘html’ and ‘pdf’ formats:

     $> cd ../strx25-0.9.2.1
     $> less doc/manual/strx25.txt
     $> lynx doc/manual/strx25.html
     $> info doc/manual/strx25.info
     $> xpdf doc/manual/strx25.pdf

The ‘text’ version of the manual is always available in the MANUAL file in the release.

The current manual is also always available online from The OpenSS7 Project website at:

     $> lynx http://www.openss7.org/strx25_manual.html

1 Introduction

This manual documents the design, implementation, installation, operation and future development schedule of the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package.

1.1 Overview

This manual documents the design, implementation, installation, operation and future development of the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package.

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is a STREAMS X25 Networking (X25) package for Linux that can be used with Linux Fast-STREAMS8. It includes development tools, header files and manual pages for OpenSS7 X.25 Networking.

1.2 Organization of this Manual

This manual is organized (loosely) into several sections as follows:

Introduction. This introduction
Objective. Objective of the package
Reference. Contents of the package
Development. Developing with the package
Conformance. Conformance of the package
Releases. Releases of the package
Installation. Installation of the package
Troubleshooting. Troubleshooting of the package

1.3 Conventions and Definitions

This manual uses texinfo typographic conventions.

2 Objective

3 Reference

3.1 Files

STRX25 creates the following kernel modules files in the kernel modules directory, /lib/modules/2.4.20-28.7/:9

modules.strx25

STRX25 installs the following kernel module files in the kernel modules directory, /lib/modules/2.4.20-28.7/strx25/:10

streams_cmot.ko
This kernel module contains the STREAMS cmot(4) module.
streams_isot.ko
This kernel module contains the STREAMS isot(4) module.
streams_itot.ko
This kernel module contains the STREAMS itot(4) module.
streams_lpp.ko
This kernel module contains the STREAMS lpp(4) module.
streams_tcpns.ko
This kernel module contains the STREAMS tcpns(4) module.
streams_xot.ko
This kernel module contains the STREAMS xot(4) module.
streams_clns.ko
This kernel module contains the STREAMS clns(4) driver.
streams_x25-lapb.ko
This kernel module contains the STREAMS lapb(4) driver.
streams_x25-plp.ko
This kernel module contains the STREAMS plp(4) driver.

STRX25 installs the following header files in the system include directory, /usr/include/strx25/:

xti.h
xti_osi.h
sys/xti_osi.h
xti_mosi.h
sys/xti_mosi.h
sys/strx25/config.h
sys/strx25/version.h
This file contains kernel and system tailoring information for the ‘OpenSS7 X.25 Networking’ kernel modules.
2.4.20-28.7/i686/sys/strx25/modversions.h
This file contains module and symbol version information for the ‘OpenSS7 X.25 Networking’ kernel modules. This file is only applicable to Linux kernels in the 2.4 series. 11

STRX25 installs the following test programs in the system libexec directory, /usr/libexec/strx25/:12

send-pr
send-pr.config
The send-pr stand-alone shell script can be used for the automatic generation of problem reports for the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package. The send-pr.config file provides localized definitions used by the send-pr program. For more information on problem reports, See Problem Reports, and, in particular, See Stand Alone Problem Reports.
testsuite
atlocal
The testsuite stand-alone shell script invokes test cases in the test programs above as compiled into a comprehensive regression, troubleshooting and validation test suite for the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking drivers. The atlocal file provides localized definitions used by the testsuite program. For more information on test suites, See Test Suites, and, in particular, See Running Test Suites.

STRX25 installs the following utility programs in the system binary directory, /usr/sbin/:

strx25_mknod
This utility can be used by init scripts or administrative users to create or remove device nodes in the /dev directory for OpenSS7 X.25 Networking drivers.

STRX25 installs the following init scripts in the system init directory, /etc/rc.d/init.d/ (non-Debian) or /etc/init.d/ (Debian):

strx25
This is the name of the system init script on non-Debian based systems.
strx25.sh
This is the name of the system init script on Debian based systems.

STRX25 installs the following system configuration files in the configuration directory, /etc/:

strx25.conf
This file provided configuration information for any system controls affected by the ‘strx25’ package.
modutils/strx25
This file provides module definitions and demand loading aliases for the strx25 package. This file is really only applicable to older 2.4 kernels.
netconfig.d/strx25
This file provides the netconfig(5) definitions for the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking drivers. netconfig(5) definitions are used by the strnsl package and the libxnsl library.
sock2path.d/strx25
This file provides the sock2path(5) definitions for the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking drivers. sock2path(5) definitions are used by the strsock package and the libsocket library.

STRX25 installs the following system configuration file in the system configuration directory, /etc/sysconfig/ (non-Debian) or /etc/default/ (Debian):

strx25
This file provides system configuration information used by init scripts for the ‘strx25’ package. Some options of init script execution can be controlled by this file.

STRX25 installs the following info files in the system info directory, /usr/share/info/:

strx25.info
strx25.info-1
strx25.info-2
These files contain this manual in GNU info format.

STRX25 installs the following manpage macros and reference database files in the system man directory, /usr/share/man/:13

strx25.macros
This file contains manual page macro definitions included by the manual pages included in the package.
strx25.refs
This file contains a reference database referenced by the manual pages included in the package.

STRX25 installs the following manual pages in the system man directory, /usr/share/man/man4/:

clns.4
cmot.4
iso-ip.4
isos.4
isot.4
iso-lan.4
iso-udp.4
itos.4
itot.4
lapb.4
lpp.4
ns-tcp.4
plp.4
tcpns.4
tp0.4
tp1.4
tp2.4
tp3.4
tp4.4
tp.4
x25-lapb.4
x25-plp.4
x25_lapb.4
x25_plp.4
xol.4
xot.4

STRX25 installs the following manual pages in the system man directory, /usr/share/man/man5/:

strx25.5
manual page for the strx25(5) package.

STRX25 installs the following manual pages in the system man directory, /usr/share/man/man7/:

npi_osi.7

STRX25 installs the following manual pages in the system man directory, /usr/share/man/man8/:

strx25_mknod.8
Documentation for the strx25_mknod(8) utility program.

3.2 Drivers

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package provides the following STREAMS drivers:

clns(4) (streams_clns.ko)
Contains the clns(4) driver.
lapb(4) (streams_x25-lapb.ko)
Contains the lapb(4) driver.
plp(4) (streams_x25-plp.ko)
Contains the plp(4) driver.

3.3 Modules

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package provides the following STREAMS modules:

cmot(4) (streams_cmot.ko)
Contains the cmot(4) module.
isot(4) (streams_isot.ko)
Contains the isot(4) module.
itot(4) (streams_itot.ko)
Contains the itot(4) module.
lpp(4) (streams_lpp.ko)
Contains the lpp(4) module.
tcpns(4) (streams_tcpns.ko)
Contains the tcpns(4) module.
xot(4) (streams_xot.ko)
Contains the xot(4) module.

3.4 Libraries

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package provides the following shared object and static libraries:

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package does not currently provide any libraries.

3.5 Utilities

3.5.1 Init Scripts

Following are System V Init Scripts that are installed by the package:

strx25(8) (/etc/init.d/strx25)
strx25.sh(8) (/etc/init.d/strx25.sh)
System V Init Script for the X25 Subsystem. The strx25(8) init script provides the ability to initialize, configure and mount the X25 subsystem, strxnet(5). The strx25(8) script provides the RedHat-style init script, whereas the strx25.sh(8) script provides the Debian-style init script.

See strx25(8) for more information.

3.5.2 Administrative Utilities

Following are user utilities for manipulating INET:

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package builds and installs the following utilities:

strx25_mknod
This is a C-language program that can be used by startup scripts to create device nodes for the ‘strx25’ package. This utility is normally installed in the /usr/sbin directory. See strx25_mknod(8) for more information.
strx25
This is a RedHat-style System V init script that is installed and used to start and stop the ‘strx25’ package. Starting consists of creating X.25 device nodes using strx25_mknod and installing the streams-sctp and streams-tpiperf modules in the running kernel. This init script is normally installed in the /etc/init.d directory.
strx25.sh
This is a Debian-style System V init script that is installed and used to start and stop the ‘strx25’ package in a similar fashion to the strx25 script, but in the Debian style. This init script is normally installed in the /etc/rc.d/init.d directory.

3.5.3 Performance Test Programs

Following are performance test programs:

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package does not yet contain any performance programs. For performance testing of various transport providers, see the netperf-2.3.7 package.

3.5.4 Conformance Test Programs

Following are conformance and validation test programs included in the package:

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package builds and installs the following test programs:

For more information on the use of the problem reporting scripts, see Generating Problem Reports.

4 Development

OpenSS7 X.25 Networking provides all of the header files, shared object and static libraries, manual pages and documentation necessary for the development of both user space applications programs and kernel space STREAMS modules and drivers based on the package. The sections that follow describe these development facilities.

4.1 Header Files

Header files are installed, typically, in the /usr/include/strx25/ subdirectory. To use the header files from the package, ‘-I/usr/include/strx25’ must be included in the gcc command line as a preprocessor option.

In general, ‘-I’ include preprocessor directives on the gcc command line should be ordered in the reverse order of the dependencies between packages. So, for example, if the include files from all add-on packages are required, the order of these directives would be: ‘-I/usr/include/strx25’ ‘-I/usr/include/strxns’ ‘-I/usr/include/strcompat’ ‘-I/usr/include/streams’.

Following are the user visible header files provided by the strx25-0.9.2.1 package in the directory /usr/include/strx25:

4.1.1 User Space Programs

Typical include files for interacting with Transport providers from user space include the xti.h header file. Additional header files for interacting with specific drivers or modules may also be required. The xti.h header file is for interacting with the XTI library.

4.1.2 Kernel Space Drivers and Modules

Typical include files for writing STREAMS module and drivers implementing transport providers in kernels space include xti.h and xti_sctp.h. The header files provide access to definitions for the TPI interface and additional XTI definitions for use by STREAMS drivers and modules. Additional header files for interacting with specific drivers or modules may also be required.

Aside from including this header files, the general procedures for compiling STREAMS modules and drivers also apply to STREAMS modules and drivers written to the Transport Provider Interface.

4.2 Libraries

Shared or static version of the libxnet library may be linked when using the strx25-0.9.2.1 package.14 The library may either be specified on the gcc command line as a shared library (e.g. ‘-lxnet’) or as a static library (e.g. ‘/usr/lib/libxnet.a’).

If the shared object library is linked, include the following options on the gcc command line:

-lxnet
Link to the /usr/lib/libxnet.so shared library.

If the static library is linked, include the following options on the gcc command line:

/usr/lib/libxnet.a
Link to the /usr/lib/libxnet.a static library.

4.3 Kernel Modules

Developing TPI kernel modules is similar to user space programs with regard to header files. /usr/include/strxnet should be placed as an include directory to search on the gcc command line. The rules for compiling Linux kernel modules and the rules for compiling STREAMS modules and drivers should be followed. In particular, several important intricacies should be considered:

  • The gcc compiler used to compile the kernel modules must be the same version of compiler that was used to compile the kernel and STREAMS base package.
  • The gcc command line must have the same compile flags that were used to compile the kernel and STREAMS base package. kbuild can be used to accomplish this.
  • The gcc command line must define several important kernel defines including ‘-DLINUX’, ‘-D__KERNEL__’, as well as the base name of the module. Again, kbuild can be used to accomplish this.
  • The gcc command line must include several important files directly on the command line, such as, ‘--include /lib/modules/2.4.20-28.7/build/include/linux/autoconf.h’ and ‘--include /lib/modules/2.4.20-28.7/build/include/linux/modversions.h’.15

4.4 Manual Pages

To assist in the development of user programs and STREAMS driver or modules using the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking protocol module, the following manual pages are provided:

The strx25-0.9.2.1 package installs a number of manual pages in the /usr/share/man directory as follows:

The following manual pages are installed in Section 3 of the manual (in the subdirectory /usr/share/man/man3):

To assist in the development of user programs and STREAMS driver or modules using the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking protocol module, the following header files are provided:

5 Conformance

Although OpenSS7 Project software is of high quality, and untested behaviour is often correct behaviour, the principle of the OpenSS7 Project is to test all functional requirements against the behaviour of the package in a repeatable validation test suite that can be used to perform regression, target architecture validation and trouble shooting, (see Maturity, and see Test Suites).

5.1 NPI Interface Conformance

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking drivers conform to the Network Provider Interface (NPI) Revision 2.0.0 as released by UNIX International. A copy of the original document is available from The OpenSS7 Project Website. A reprint of the document specifying this version of the protocol is available as part of the ‘strxns’ package available on line in PDF format, or also in simple HTML format.

5.2 TPI Interface Conformance

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking drivers conform to the Transport Provider Interface (TPI) Revision 2.0.0 as released by UNIX International. A copy of the original document is available from The OpenSS7 Project Website. A reprint of the document specifying this version of the protocol is available as part of the ‘strxnet’ package available on line in PDF format, or also in simple HTML format.

5.3 XTI Interface Conformance

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking drivers conform to the X/Open Transport Interface/Transport Layer Interface (XTI/TLI) X/Open Networking Services (XNS) Revision 5.2 as released by The OpenGroup. A copy of the original document is available from The OpenGroup website. Reprints of the document are not available from The OpenSS7 Project website due to copyright restrictions. Similar information is available in the manual pages that accompany the ‘strxnet’ package. These can be viewed on line starting at XTI/TLI manpage.

5.4 IETF Conformance

6 Releases

This is the OpenSS7 Release of the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking tools, drivers and modules used with the Linux Fast-STREAMS or Linux STREAMS16 SVR 4.2 STREAMS releases.

The purpose of providing a separate release of this package was to separate the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking tools, headers, drivers and modules from the Linux STREAMS17 package for use with both Linux STREAMS18 and Linux Fast-STREAMS in preparation for replacement of the former by the later.

The following sections provide information on OpenSS7 X.25 Networking releases as well as compatibility information of OpenSS7 release to the original GCOM releases of these modules and drivers, as well as Linux kernel compatibility.

6.1 Prerequisites

2.6.26exinfo -*- vim: ft=texinfo

The quickest and easiest way to ensure that all prerequisites are met is to download and install this package from within the OpenSS7 Master Package, openss7-0.9.2.G, instead of separately.

Prerequisites for the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package are as follows:

  1. Linux distribution, somewhat Linux Standards Base compliant, with a 2.4 or 2.6 kernel and the appropriate tool chain for compiling out-of-tree kernel modules. Most recent Linux distributions are usable out of the box, but some development packages must be installed. For more information, see Compatibility.

    − A fairly LSB compliant GNU/Linux distribution.19
    − Linux 2.4 kernel (2.4.10 - 2.4.27), or
    − Linux 2.6 kernel (2.6.3 - 2.6.26);
    − glibc2 or better.
    − GNU groff (for man pages).20
    − GNU texinfo (for info files).
    − GNU bison and flex (for config programs).
    − net-snmp (for SNMP agents).21

(Note: If you acquired strx25 a part of the OpenSS7 Master Package, then the dependencies listed below will already have been met by unpacking the master package.)

  1. OpenSS7 Linux Fast-STREAMS, streams-0.9.2.4. 22
  2. OpenSS7 STREAMS Compatibility Modules, strcompat-0.9.2.7.
  3. OpenSS7 STREAMS XNS, strxns-0.9.2.7.
  4. OpenSS7 STREAMS XTI/TLI, strxnet-0.9.2.12.
  5. OpenSS7 STREAM Network Services Library, strnsl-0.9.2.4. (Optional.)
  6. OpenSS7 STREAMS Sockets, strsock-0.9.2.4. (Optional.)
  7. OpenSS7 STREAMS INET, strinet-0.9.2.7.
  8. OpenSS7 STREAMS SCTP, strsctp-0.9.2.9.
  9. OpenSS7 STREAMS Channels, strchan-0.9.2.4.

If you need to rebuild the package from sources with modifications, you will need a larger GNU tool chain as described in See Downloading from CVS.

6.2 Compatibility

This section discusses compatibility with major prerequisites.

6.2.1 GNU/Linux Distributions

OpenSS7 X.25 Networking is compatible with the following Linux distributions:23

  • CentOS Enterprise Linux 3.4 (centos34) TBD
  • CentOS Enterprise Linux 4.0 (centos4) TBD
  • CentOS Enterprise Linux 4.92 (centos49) TBD
  • CentOS Enterprise Linux 5.0 (centos5)
  • CentOS Enterprise Linux 5.1 (centos51)
  • CentOS Enterprise Linux 5.2 (centos52)
  • Debian 3.0r2 Woody (deb3.0) TBD
  • Debian 3.1r0a Sarge (deb3.1) TBD
  • Debian 4.0r1 Etch (deb4.0)
  • Debian 4.0r2 Etch (deb4.0)
  • Debian 4.0r3 Etch (deb4.0)
  • Fedora Core 1 (FC1) TBD
  • Fedora Core 2 (FC2) TBD
  • Fedora Core 3 (FC3) TBD
  • Fedora Core 4 (FC4) TBD
  • Fedora Core 5 (FC5) TBD
  • Fedora Core 6 (FC6) TBD
  • Fedora 7 (FC7)
  • Fedora 8 (FC8)
  • Fedora 9 (FC9)
  • Gentoo 2006.1 (untested) TBD
  • Gentoo 2007.1 (untested) TBD
  • Lineox 4.026 (LEL4) TBD
  • Lineox 4.053 (LEL4) TBD
  • Mandrakelinux 9.2 (MDK92) TBD
  • Mandrakelinux 10.0 (MDK100) TBD
  • Mandrakelinux 10.1 (MDK101) TBD
  • Mandriva Linux LE2005 (MDK102) TBD
  • Mandriva Linux LE2006 (MDK103) TBD
  • Mandriva One (untested)
  • RedHat Linux 7.2 (RH7)
  • RedHat Linux 7.3 (RH7)
  • RedHat Linux 8.0 (RH8) TBD
  • RedHat Linux 9 (RH9) TBD
  • RedHat Enterprise Linux 3.0 (EL3) TBD
  • RedHat Enterprise Linux 4 (EL4)
  • RedHat Enterprise Linux 5 (EL5)
  • SuSE 8.0 Professional (SuSE8.0) TBD
  • SuSE 9.1 Personal (SuSE9.1) TBD
  • SuSE 9.2 Professional (SuSE9.2) TBD
  • SuSE OpenSuSE (SuSEOSS) TBD
  • SuSE 10.0 (SuSE10.0) TBD
  • SuSE 10.1 (SuSE10.1) TBD
  • SuSE 10.2 (SuSE10.2) TBD
  • SuSE 10.3 (SuSE10.3) TBD
  • SuSE 11.0 (SuSE11.0)
  • SLES 9 (SLES9) TBD
  • SLES 9 SP2 (SLES9) TBD
  • SLES 9 SP3 (SLES9) TBD
  • SLES 10 (SLES10)
  • Ubuntu 5.10 (ubu5.10) TBD
  • Ubuntu 6.03 LTS (ubu6.03) TBD
  • Ubuntu 6.10 (ubu6.10) TBD
  • Ubuntu 7.04 (ubu7.04) TBD
  • Ubuntu 7.10 (ubu7.10)
  • Ubuntu 8.04 (ubu8.04)
  • WhiteBox Enterprise Linux 3.0 (WBEL3) TBD
  • WhiteBox Enterprise Linux 4 (WBEL4) TBD

When installing from the tarball (see Installing the Tar Ball), this distribution is probably compatible with a much broader array of distributions than those listed above. These are the distributions against which the current maintainer creates and tests builds.

6.2.2 Kernel

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package compiles as a Linux kernel module. It is not necessary to patch the Linux kernel to build or use the package.24 Nor do you have to recompile your kernel to build or use the package. OpenSS7 packages use autoconf scripts to adapt the package source to your existing kernel. The package builds and runs nicely against production kernels from the distributions listed above. Rather than relying on kernel versions, the autoconf scripts interrogate the kernel for specific features and variants to better adapt to distribution production kernels that have had patches applied over the official kernel.org sources.

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is compatible with 2.4 kernel series after 2.4.10 and has been tested up to and including 2.4.27. It has been tested from 2.6.3 up to and including 2.6.26 (with Fedora 9, openSUSE 11.0 and Ubuntu 8.04 patchsets). Please note that your mileage may vary if you use a kernel more recent than 2.6.26.4: it is difficult to anticipate changes that kernel developers will make in the future. Many kernels in the 2.6 series now vary widely by release version and if you encounter problems, try a kernel within the supported series.

UP validation testing for kernels is performed on all supported architectures. SMP validation testing was initially performed on UP machines, as well as on an Intel 3.0GHz Pentium IV 630 with HyperThreading enabled (2x). Because HyperThreading is not as independent as multiple CPUs, SMP validation testing was limited. Current releases have been tested on dual 1.8GHz Xeon HP servers (2x) as well as dual quad-core SunFire (8x) servers.

It should be noted that, while the packages will configure, build and install against XEN kernels, that problems running validation test suites against XEN kernels has been reported. XEN kernels are explicitly not supported. This may change at some point in the future if someone really requires running OpenSS7 under a XEN kernel.

6.2.3 Architectures

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package compiles and installs on a wide range of architectures. Although it is believed that the package will work on all architectures supported by the Linux kernel being used, validation testing has only been performed with the following architectures:

  • ix86
  • x86_64
  • ppc (MPC 860)
  • ppc64

32-bit compatibility validation testing is performed on all 64-bit architectures supporting 32-bit compatibility. If you would like to validate an OpenSS7 package on a specific machine architecture, you are welcome to sponsor the project with a test machine.

6.2.4 Linux STREAMS

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is currently compatible with Linux STREAMS,25 however, to use the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package with LiS requires use of the OpenSS7 release packages of LiS. The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is compatible with the OpenSS7 LiS-2.18.7 release that is available from the The OpenSS7 Project Downloads Page. But, do not use LiS: it is buggy, unsupported and deprecated. Use Linux Fast-STREAMS instead.

6.2.5 Linux Fast-STREAMS

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is currently compatible with Linux Fast-STREAMS (LfS). The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is compatible with the OpenSS7 streams-0.9.2.4 release that is available from the The OpenSS7 Project Downloads Page.

6.3 Release Notes

The sections that follow provide information on OpenSS7 releases of the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package.

Initial release strx25-0.9.2.1

Initial autoconf/RPM packaging of the strx25 release.

This is the initial open source release of the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package. This release contains modules and drivers formerly only available with Commercial releases of the strss7 package and which are only recently available as open source with the release of this package.

With OpenSS7 Master Package release openss7-0.9.2.D, the ISO/OSI components were separated from the strss7 package and placed in this package. Not all of the ISO/OSI components previously part of the strss7 package have been strapped into this release. Components will be re-validated against Linux Fast-STREAMS on a module-by-module and driver-by-driver basis. See TODO in the release, or Schedule, for information about the release schedule.

In this initial release, the major component first available is LAPB. lapb(4) is a pushable STREAMS module that is pushed over a cdi(4) HDLC channel to form an X.25 data link providing the Data Link Provider Interface, dlpi(7). A complete test suite will be available in a further release.

Subsequent releases in 4Q 2008 will include the additional full ISO/OSI X.25< CONS, CLNS, and TP0 through TP4, drivers with conformance test suites.

6.4 Maturity

The OpenSS7 Project adheres to the following release philosophy:

  • pre-alpha release
  • alpha release
  • beta release
  • gamma release
  • production release
  • unstable release

6.4.1 Pre-Alpha Releases

Pre-alpha releases are releases that have received no testing whatsoever. Code in the release is not even known to configure or compile. The purpose of a pre-alpha release is to make code and documentation available for inspection only, and to solicit comments on the design approach or other characteristics of the software package.

Pre-alpha release packages ship containing warnings recommending that the user not even execute the contained code.

6.4.2 Alpha Releases

Alpha releases are releases that have received little to no testing, or that have been tested and contains known bugs or defects that make the package unsuitable even for testing. The purpose for an alpha release are the same as for the pre-alpha release, with the additional purpose that it is an early release of partially functional code that has problems that an external developer might be willing to fix themselves and contribute back to the project.

Alpha release packages ship containing warnings that executing the code can crash machines and might possibly do damage to systems upon which it is executed.

6.4.3 Beta Releases

Beta releases are releases that have received some testing, but the testing to date is not exhaustive. Beta release packages do not ship with known defects. All known defects are resolved before distribution; however, as exhaustive testing has not been performed, unknown defects may exist. The purpose for a beta release is to provide a baseline for other organizations to participate in the rigorous testing of the package.

Beta release packages ship containing warnings that the package has not been exhaustively tested and that the package may cause systems to crash. Suitability of software in this category for production use is not advised by the project; however, as always, is at the discretion of the user of the software.

6.4.4 Gamma Releases

Gamma releases are releases that have received exhaustive testing within the project, but external testing has been minimal. Gamma release packages do not ship with known defects. As exhaustive internal testing has been performed, unknown defects should be few. Please remember that there is NO WARRANTY on public release packages.

Gamma release packages typically resolve problems in previous beta releases, and might not have had full regression testing performed. Suitability of software in this category for production use is at the discretion of the user of the software. The OpenSS7 Project recommends that the complete validation test suites provided with the package be performed and pass on target systems before considering production use.

6.4.5 Production Releases

Production releases are releases that have received exhaustive testing within the project and validated on specific distributions and architectures. Production release packages do not ship with known defects. Please remember that there is NO WARRANTY on public release packages.

Production packages ship containing a list of validated distributions and architectures. Full regression testing of any maintenance changes is performed. Suitability of software in this category for production use on the specified target distributions and architectures is at the discretion of the user. It should not be necessary to preform validation tests on the set of supported target systems before considering production use.

6.4.6 Unstable Releases

Unstable releases are releases that have received extensive testing within the project and validated on a a wide range of distributions and architectures; however, is has tested unstable and found to be suffering from critical problems and issues that cannot be resolved. Maintenance of the package has proved impossible. Unstable release packages ship with known defects (and loud warnings). Suitability of software in this category for production use is at the discretion of the user of the software. The OpenSS7 Project recommends that the problems and issues be closely examined before this software is used even in a non-production environment. Each failing test scenario should be completely avoided by the application. OpenSS7 beta software is more stable that software in this category.

6.5 Bugs

6.5.1 Defect Notices

OpenSS7 X.25 Networking has known and unknown defects. This is a pre-alpha release. Some defects might be harmful. No validation testing whatsoever has been performed by the OpenSS7 Project on this software. The software might not even configure or compile. The OpenSS7 Project recommends that you do not use this software. Use at your own risk. Remember that there is NO WARRANTY.26

This software is pre-alpha software. As such, it will crash your kernel. Installation of the software will irreparably mangle your header files or Linux distribution in such a way as to make it unusable. Crashes will lock your system and rebooting the system will not repair the problem. You will lose all the data on your system. Because this software will crash your kernel, the resulting unstable system can destroy computer hardware or peripherals making them unusable. You will void the warranty on any system on which you run this software. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.

6.5.2 Known Defects

With the exception of packages not originally created by the OpenSS7 Project, the OpenSS7 Project software does not ship with known bugs in any release stage except pre-alpha. OpenSS7 X.25 Networking had no known bugs at the time of release.

6.5.3 Defect History

This section contains historical bugs that were encountered during development and their resolutions. This list serves two purposes:

  1. It captures bugs encountered between releases during development that could possibly reoccur (and the Moon is made of blue cheese). It therefore provides a place for users to look if they encounter a problem.
  2. It provides a low overhead bug list between releases for developers to use as a TODO list.
Bugs
(no items)

6.6 Schedule

Current Plan

This package was initially started to provide managment interfaces to platforms using the OpenSS7 protocol stacks (CMIP and CMOT interfaces) using SS7 GDMO and other GDMO. It was considered pulling some of the old isode package into this package to provide some GDMO facilities.

Since then, it was discovered that these ISO protocols are still very important to a number of industries on Linux and Linux Fast-STREAMS. These industries are the Aviation and Financial industries. Closer to the heard of telecommunications is the applications of aircraft to ground communications for the Aviation industry.

While the OpenSS7 Project's focus over the Summer of 2007 is going to be soft-switch enabling protocols, that may change if the Aviation industry steps up to this package with some funding to complete the work or by contributing changes, improvements or development to this package. Otherwise, expect this package to receive only maintenance releases over the next 8 months or so.

Things to Do
  • Important drivers and modules for the financial industry (POS, ATM, EFT) in support of POS to data center communications and data center to branch communications is as follows:
    X.25
    xot(4)
  • Important drivers and modules for the aviation industry (ATN) in support of air-ground ground stations and Boundary Intermediate System and Intermediate System ground-ground stations are as follows:
    ISO 8208 SNDCF
    ISO 8802 SNDCF
    Mobile 8208 SNDCF
    CIDIN SNDCF
    clnp(4)
    With security adaptations for the ATN network.
    esis(4)
    With subset for the ATN network.
    isis(4)
    With subset for the ATN network.
    idrp(4)
    With subset for the ATN network.

    Additional drivers and modules in support of ground-to-ground Intermediate systems and End Systems:

    isot(4)
    RFC 1006, ISO Transport over TCP.
    itot(4)
    RFC 2126, ISO Transport over TCP.
    xot(4)
    RFC 1613, Cisco X.25 over TCP.

    Additional drivers and modules in support of ground end systems:

    tp(4)
  • Testing. This package is completely untested.
    *todo*
  • Create isot(4), itot(4), lpp(4) and cmot(4) STREAMS modules and drivers.
    *todo*
  • Move already written code from the stacks or strss7 directories into the src directory.
    *done*
  • Create a skeleton directory and manual and place strx25 as a subpackage in the OpenSS7 Master Package.
    *done*
    You are reading it.

The purpose of the package was to move STREAMS ISO networking capabilities outside of the strss7 release package. The strx25 package is currently incomplete. If you are interested in the completion of this add-on package, contact info@openss7.com.

6.7 History

For the latest developments with regard to history of changes, please see the ChangeLog file in the release package.

7 Installation

7.1 Repositories

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package release can be accessed from the repositories of The OpenSS7 Project. For rpm(1) based systems, the package is available in a yum(8) repository based on repomd XML and may also be accessed using zypper(8) or yast(8). For dpkg(1) based systems, the package is available in a apt(8) repository.

By far the easiest (most repeatable and manageable) form for installing and using OpenSS7 packages is to install packages from the yum(8) or apt(8) repositories. If your distribution does not support yum(8), zypper(8), yast(8) or apt(8), then it is still possible to install the RPMs or DEBs from the repositories using rpm(1), dpkg(1); or by using wget(1) and then installing them from RPM or DEB using rpm(1) or dpkg(1) locally.

If binaries are not available for your distribution or specific kernel, but your distribution supports rpm(1) or dpkg(1), the next best method for installing and using OpenSS7 packages is to download and rebuild the source RPMs or DSCs from the repository. This can also be performed with yum(8), zypper(8), yast(8), apt(8); or directly using wget(1), rpm(1) or dpkg(1).

If your architecture does not support rpm(1) or dpkg(1) at all, or you have special needs (such as cross-compiling for embedded targets), the final resort method is to download, configure, build and install from tarball. In this later case, the easiest way to build and install OpenSS7 packages from tarball is to use the tarball for the OpenSS7 Master Package, openss7-0.9.2.G.

7.1.1 Repositories for YUM

To install or upgrade from the OpenSS7 repomd repositories, you will need a file in your /etc/yum.repo.d/ directory. This file can be obtained directly from the OpenSS7 repository, like so:

     $> REPOS="http://www.openss7.org/repos/rpms"
     $> wget $REPOS/centos/5.2/x86_64/repodata/openss7.repo
     $> sudo cp -f openss7.repo /etc/yum.repo.d/
     $> sudo yum makecache

This example assumes the the distribution is ‘centos’ and the distribution release is ‘5.2’ and the architecture requires is ‘x86_64’. Another example would be $REPOS/i686/suse/11.0/i686/repodata/openss7.repo, for using yum(8) with SUSE.

Once the repository is set up, OpenSS7 includes a number of virtual package definitions that eas the installation and removal of kernel modules, libraries and utilities. Downloading, configuring, building and installation for a single-kernel distribution is as easy as:

     $> sudo yum install strx25

Removing the package is as easy as:

     $> sudo yum remove strx25

If you have difficulty downloading the openss7.repo file, edit the following information into the file and place it into the /etc/yum.repo.d/openss7.repo file:

     -| [openss7]
     -| enabled = 1
     -| name = OpenSS7 Repository
     -| baseurl = http://www.openss7.org/repos/rpms/centos/5.2/x86_64
     -| gpgcheck = 1
     -| gpgkey = http://www.openss7.org/pubkey.asc

Note that it is also possible to point to these repositories as an additional installation source when installing CentOS, RedHat, Fedora, or others. You will have an additional STREAMS category from which to choose installation packages.

Some additional installation real or virtual package names and the installations they accomplish are as follows:

strx25
This package can be used to install or remove the entire OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package. When installing, kernel modules will be installed automatically for the highest version kernel on your system. When removing, all corresponding kernel modules will also be removed.
strx25-devel
This package can be used to install or remove the development components of the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package. When installing, ‘strx25’ and appropriate kernel module and kernel module development and debug packages will also be installed. When removing, the development package and all kernel module development and debug packages will also be removed.
strx25-2.4.20-28.7
This package can be used to install or remove the package for a specific kernel version. When installing, the ‘strx25’ package will also be installed if necessary. When removing the last kernel module package, the ‘strx25’ package will also be removed.

Note that the version ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is just an example. Use the version returned by ‘$(uname -r)’ for the kernel for which you wish to install or remove the packages.

strx25-2.4.20-28.7-devel
This package can be used to install or remove the development and debug packages for a specific kernel version. When installing, the ‘strx25’ and ‘strx25-devel’ packages will also be installed if necessary. When removing the development and debug for kernel modules for the last kernel, the ‘strx25-devel’ package will also be removed.

Note that the version ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is just an example. Use the version returned by ‘$(uname -r)’ for the kernel for which you wish to install or remove the packages.

For assistance with specific RPMs, see Downloading the Binary RPM.

7.1.2 Repositories for APT

For assistance with specific DEBs, see Downloading the Debian DEB.

7.2 Downloading

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package releases can be downloaded from the downloads page of The OpenSS7 Project. The package is available as a binary RPM (for popular architectures) a source RPM, Debian binary DEB and source DSC, or as a tar ball. If you are using a browsable viewer, you can obtain the OpenSS7 release of strx25 from the links in the sections that follow.

By far the easiest (most repeatable and manageable) form for installing and using OpenSS7 packages is to download and install individual packages from binary RPM or DEB. If binary RPMs or DEBs are not available for your distribution, but your distribution supports rpm(1) or dpkg(1), the next best method for installing and using OpenSS7 packages is to download and rebuild the source RPMs or DSCs.

If your architecture does not support rpm(1) or dpkg(1) at all, or you have special needs (such as cross-compiling for embedded targets), the final resort method is to download, configure, build and install from tarball. In this later case, the easiest way to build and install OpenSS7 packages from tarball is to use the tarball for the OpenSS7 Master Package, openss7-0.9.2.G.

7.2.1 Downloading with YUM

OpenSS7 repositories support yum(8) and zypper(8) in repomd XML format as well as YaST and YaST2 formats.

OpenSS7 includes virtual packages that ease the installation and removal of kernel modules, libraries and utilities. Downloading, configuration, building and installation for a signle-kernel distribution installation is as easy as:

     % sudo yum install strx25

This and additional packages for installation are detailed as follows:

strx25
Install this package if you need the runtime strx25 package.
          % sudo yum install strx25

This will install the strx25, strx25-lib and strx25-KVERSION RPMs, where ‘KVERSION’ is the highest version number kernel on your system.

Remove this package if you need to remove all vestages of the strx25 package.

          % sudo yum remove strx25

This will remove the strx25, strx25-lib, strx25-devel, strx25-KVERSION and strx25-devel-KVERSION RPMs for all kernels on your system.

strx25-devel
Install this package if you need the development strx25 package.
          % sudo yum install strx25-devel

This will install the strx25, strx25-lib, strx25-devel, strx25-KVERSION and strx25-devel-KVERSION RPMs, where ‘KVERSION’ is the highest version number kernel on your system.

Remove this package if you do not need development capabilities for the strx25 package for any kernel.

          % sudo yum remove strx25-devel

This will remove the strx25-devel and strx25-devel-KVERSION RPMs for all kernels on your system.

strx25-2.4.20-28.7
Install this package if you need the runtime strx25 for kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’. The value ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is just an example. For the running kernel, you can install the runtime strx25 components with:
          % sudo yum install strx25-$(uname -r)

This will install the strx25, strx25-lib and strx25-2.4.20-28.7 RPMs, where ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is the kernel version specified.

Remove this package if you no longer need the runtime strx25 for kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’. The value ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is just an example. For the running kernel, you can remove the runtime strx25 components with:

          % sudo yum remove strx25-$(uname -r)

This will remove the strx25-2.4.20-28.7 and strx25-devel-2.4.20-28.7 RPMs, where ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is the kernel version specified. Also, if this is the last kernel for which strx25 was installed, the strx25 strx25-lib and strx25-devel RPMs will also be removed.

Note that this is a virtual package name: the actual RPMs installed or removed from the system is a kernel module package whose precise name will depend upon the system being used.

strx25-devel-2.4.20-28.7
Install this package if you need the development strx25 package for kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’. The value ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is just an example. For the running kernel, you can install the kernel development strx25 components with:
          % sudo yum install strx25-devel-$(uname -r)

This will install the strx25, strx25-lib, strx25-devel, strx25-2.4.20-28.7 and strx25-devel-2.4.20-28.7 RPMs, where ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is the kernel version specified.

Remove this package if you no longer need the development capabilities for the strx25 package for kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’. The value ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is just an example. For the running kernel, you can remove the kernel development strx25 components with:

          % sudo yum remove strx25-devel-$(uname -r)

This will remove the strx25-devel-2.4.20-28.7 RPMs, where ‘2.4.20-28.7’ is the kernel version specified. Also, if this is the last kernel for which strx25 was installed, the strx25-devel RPMs will also be removed.

Note that this is a virtual package name: the actual RPMs installed or removed from the system is a kernel module package whose precise name will depend upon the system being used.

strx25-lib
This package is an auxillary package that should be removed and inserted automatically by yum(8). In rare instances you might need to remove or install this package explicitly.

7.2.2 Downloading with APT

OpenSS7 repositries support apt(8) repositorie digests and signatures.

7.2.3 Downloading the Binary RPM

To install from binary RPM, you will need several of the RPM for a complete installation. Binary RPM fall into several categories. To download and install a complete package requires the appropriate RPM from each of the several categories below, as applicable. Some release packages do not provide RPMs in each of the several categories.

To install from Binary RPM, you will need all of the following kernel independent packages for your architecture, and one of the kernel-dependent packages from the next section.

Independent RPM

Independent RPM are dependent on neither the Linux kernel version, nor the STREAMS package. For example, the source package ‘strx25-source-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.noarch.rpm’, is not dependent on kernel nor STREAMS package.

All of the following kernel and STREAMS independent RPM are required for your architecture. Binary RPMs listed here are for example only: additional binary RPMs are available from the downloads site. If your architecture is not available, you can build binary RPM from the source RPM (see see Building from the Source RPM).

Architecture Independent
strx25-dev-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.noarch.rpm
The strx25-dev package contains the device definitions necessary to run applications programs developed for OpenSS7 X.25 Networking.27
strx25-doc-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.noarch.rpm
The strx25-doc package contains this manual in plain text, postscript, pdf and html forms, along with the meta-information from the strx25 package. It also contains all of the manual pages necessary for developing OpenSS7 X.25 Networking applications and OpenSS7 X.25 Networking STREAMS modules or drivers.
strx25-init-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.noarch.rpm
The strx25-init package contains the init scripts and provides the ‘postinst’ scripts necessary to create kernel module preloads and modules definitions for all kernel module ‘core’ subpackages.
strx25-source-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.noarch.rpm
The strx25-source package contains the source code necessary for building the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking release. It includes the autoconf(1) configuration utilities necessary to create and distribute tarballs, rpm and deb/dsc. 28
Architecture Dependent
strx25-devel-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-devel package contains library archives for static compilation, header files to develop OpenSS7 X.25 Networking modules and drivers. This also includes the header files and static libraries required to compile OpenSS7 X.25 Networking applications programs.
strx25-lib-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-lib package contains the run-time shared libraries necessary to run application programs and utilities developed for the strx25 package. 29
STREAMS-Dependent RPM

STREAMS-Dependent RPM are dependent upon the specific STREAMS package being used, either Linux STREAMS or Linux Fast-STREAMS. Packages dependent upon Linux STREAMS will have LiS in the package name. Packages dependent upon Linux Fast-STREAMS will have streams in the package name. Note that some STREAMS-Dependent RPM are also Kernel-Dependent RPM as described below.

One of the following STREAMS-Dependent packages is required for your architecture. If your architecture is not on the list, you can build binary RPM from the source RPM (see see Building from the Source RPM).

strx25-LiS-util-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-LiS-util package provides administrative and configuration test utilities and commands associated with the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package. Because this package must link a STREAMS-specific library, it is a STREAMS-Dependent package. Use the strx25-LiS-util package if you have LiS installed.
strx25-streams-util-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-streams-util package provides administrative and configuration test utilities and commands associated with the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package. Because this package must link a STREAMS-specific library, it is a STREAMS-Dependent package. Use the strx25-streams-util package if you have streams installed.
Kernel-Dependent RPM

Kernel-Dependent RPM are dependent on specific Linux Kernel Binary RPM releases. Packages are provided for popular released RedHat kernels. Packages dependent upon RedHat or other kernel RPM will have the ‘_kversion’ kernel package version in the package name.

One of the following Kernel-Dependent packages is required for your architecture and kernel version. If your architecture or kernel version is not on the list, you can build binary RPM from the source RPM (see see Building from the Source RPM).30

strx25-core-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-core package contains the loadable kernel modules that depend only on the kernel. This package is heavily tied to the kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.31
strx25-info-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-info package32 contains the module symbol version information for the core subpackage, above. It is possible to load this subpackage and compile modules that use the exported symbols without loading the actual kernel modules (from the core subpackage above). This package is heavily tied to the kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.33
strx25-LiS-core-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-LiS-core package contains the kernel modules that provide the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking STREAMS modules and drivers. This package is heavily tied to the STREAMS package and kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to LiS (Linux STREAMS) on kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.34
strx25-streams-core-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-streams-core package contains the kernel modules that provide the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking STREAMS modules and drivers. This package is heavily tied to the STREAMS package and kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to streams (Linux Fast-STREAMS) on kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.35
strx25-LiS-info-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-LiS-info package36 contains the module symbol version information for the LiS-core subpackage, above. It is possible to load this subpackage and compile modules that use the exported symbols without loaded the actual kernel modules (from the LiS-core subpackage above). This package is heavily tied to the STREAMS package and kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to LiS (Linux STREAMS) on kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.37
strx25-streams-info-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
The strx25-streams-info package38 contains the module symbol version information for the streams-core subpackage, above. It is possible to load this subpackage and compile modules that use the exported symbols without loaded the actual kernel modules (from the streams-core subpackage above). This package is heavily tied to the STREAMS package and kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to streams (Linux Fast-STREAMS) on kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.39
Configuration and Installation

To configure, build and install the binary RPM, See Configuring the Binary RPM.

7.2.4 Downloading the Debian DEB

To install from binary DEB, you will need several of the DEB for a complete installation. Binary DEB fall into several categories. To download and install a complete package requires the appropriate DEB from each of the several categories below, as applicable. Some release packages do not provide DEBs in each of the several categories.

To install from Binary DEB, you will need all of the following kernel independent packages for your architecture, and one of the kernel-dependent packages from the next section.

Independent DEB

Independent DEB are dependent on neither the Linux kernel version, nor the STREAMS package. For example, the source package ‘strx25-source_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb’, is not dependent on kernel nor STREAMS package.

All of the following kernel and STREAMS independent DEB are required for your architecture. Binary DEBs listed here are for example only: additional binary DEBs are available from the downloads site. If your architecture is not available, you can build binary DEB from the Debian DSC (see see Building from the Debian DSC).

Architecture Independent
strx25-dev_0.9.2.1-0_all.deb
The strx25-dev package contains the device definitions necessary to run applications programs developed for OpenSS7 X.25 Networking. 40
strx25-doc_0.9.2.1-0_all.deb
The strx25-doc package contains this manual in plain text, postscript, pdf and html forms, along with the meta-information from the strx25 package. It also contains all of the manual pages necessary for developing OpenSS7 X.25 Networking applications and OpenSS7 X.25 Networking STREAMS modules or drivers.
strx25-init_0.9.2.1-0_all.deb
The strx25-init package contains the init scripts and provides the postinst scripts necessary to create kernel module preloads and modules definitions for all kernel module ‘core’ subpackages.
strx25-source_0.9.2.1-0_all.deb
The strx25-source package contains the source code necessary for building the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking release. It includes the autoconf(1) configuration utilities necessary to create and distribute tarballs, rpms and deb/dscs. 41
Architecture Dependent
strx25-devel_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-devel package contains library archives for static compilation, header files to develop OpenSS7 X.25 Networking modules and drivers. This also includes the header files and static libraries required to compile OpenSS7 X.25 Networking applications programs.
strx25-lib_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-lib package contains the run-time shared libraries necessary to run application programs and utilities developed for the strx25 package. 42
STREAMS-Dependent DEB

STREAMS-Dependent DEB are dependent upon the specific STREAMS package being used, either Linux STREAMS or Linux Fast-STREAMS. Packages dependent upon Linux STREAMS will have LiS in the package name. Packages dependent upon Linux Fast-STREAMS will have streams in the package name. Note that some STREAMS-Dependent DEB are also Kernel-Dependent DEB as described below.

One of the following STREAMS-Dependent packages is required for your architecture. If your architecture is not on the list, you can build binary DEB from the Debian DSC (see see Building from the Debian DSC).

strx25-LiS-util_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-LiS-util package provides administrative and configuration test utilities and commands associated with the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package. Because this package must link a STREAMS-specific library, it is a STREAMS-Dependent package. Use the strx25-LiS-util package if you have LiS installed.
strx25-streams-util_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-streams-util package provides administrative and configuration test utilities and commands associated with the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package. Because this package must link a STREAMS-specific library, it is a STREAMS-Dependent package. Use the strx25-streams-util package if you have streams installed.
Kernel-Dependent DEB

Kernel-Dependent DEB are dependent on specific Linux Kernel Binary DEB releases. Packages are provided for popular released Debian kernels. Packages dependent upon Debian or other kernel DEB will have the ‘_kversion’ kernel package version in the package name.

One of the following Kernel-Dependent packages is required for your architecture and kernel version. If your architecture or kernel version is not on the list, you can build binary DEB from the source DEB (see see Building from the Debian DSC).43

strx25-core-2.4.20-28.7_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-core package contains the loadable kernel modules that depend only on the kernel. This package is heavily tied to the kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.44
strx25-info-2.4.20-28.7_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-info package45 contains the module symbol version information for the core subpackage, above. It is possible to load this subpackage and compile modules that use the exported symbols without loading the actual kernel modules (from the core subpackage above). This package is heavily tied to the kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.46
strx25-LiS-core-2.4.20-28.7_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-LiS-core package contains the kernel modules that provide the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking STREAMS modules and drivers. This package is heavily tied to the STREAMS package and kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to LiS (Linux STREAMS) on kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.47
strx25-streams-core-2.4.20-28.7_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-streams-core package contains the kernel modules that provide the OpenSS7 X.25 Networking STREAMS modules and drivers. This package is heavily tied to the STREAMS package and kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to streams (Linux Fast-STREAMS) on kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.48
strx25-LiS-info-2.4.20-28.7_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-LiS-info package49 contains the module symbol version information for the LiS-core subpackage, above. It is possible to load this subpackage and compile modules that use the exported symbols without loaded the actual kernel modules (from the LiS-core subpackage above). This package is heavily tied to the STREAMS package and kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to LiS (Linux STREAMS) on kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.50
strx25-streams-info-2.4.20-28.7_0.9.2.1-0_i386.deb
The strx25-streams-info package51 contains the module symbol version information for the streams-core subpackage, above. It is possible to load this subpackage and compile modules that use the exported symbols without loaded the actual kernel modules (from the streams-core subpackage above). This package is heavily tied to the STREAMS package and kernel for which it was compiled. This particular package applies to streams (Linux Fast-STREAMS) on kernel version ‘2.4.20-28.7’.52
Configuration and Installation

To configure, build and install the Debian DEB, See Configuring the Debian DEB.

7.2.5 Downloading the Source RPM

If you cannot obtain a binary RPM for your architecture, or would like to roll you own binary RPM, download the following source RPM.

strx25-0.9.2.1-1.src.rpm
This is the source RPM for the package. From this source RPM it is possible to build binary RPM for any supported architecture and for any 2.4 or 2.6 kernel, for either Linux STREAMS or Linux Fast-STREAMS.
Configuration

To configure the source RPM, See Configuring the Source RPM.

7.2.6 Downloading the Debian DSC

If you cannot obtain a binary DEB for your architecture, or would like to roll your own DEB, download the following Debian DSC.

strx25_0.9.2.1-0.dsc
strx25_0.9.2.1-0.tar.gz
This is the Debian DSC for the package. From this Debian DSC it is possible to build binary DEB for any supported architecture and for any 2.4 or 2.6 kernel, for either Linux STREAMS or Linux Fast-STREAMS.
Configuration

To configure the source RPM, See Configuring the Debian DSC.

7.2.7 Downloading the Tar Ball

For non-rpm(1) and non-dpkg(1) architectures, download the tarball as follows:

strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.gz
strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2
These are the tar(1) balls for the release. These tar(1) balls contain the autoconf(1) distribution which includes all the source necessary for building and installing the package. These tarballs will even build Source RPM and Binary RPM on rpm(1) architectures and Debian DSC and DEB on dpkg(1) architectures.

The tar ball may be downloaded easily with wget(1) as follows:

     % wget http://www.openss7.org/strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2

or

     % wget http://www.openss7.org/strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.gz

Note that you will need an OpenSS7 Project user name and password to download release candidates (which are only available to subscribers and sponsors of the OpenSS7 Project).

Unpacking the Archive

After downloading one of the tar balls, unpack the archive using one of the following commands:

     % wget http://www.openss7.org/strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.gz
     % tar -xzvf strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.gz

or

     % wget http://www.openss7.org/strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2
     % tar -xjvf strx25-0.9.2.1.tar.bz2

Either will create a subdirectory name strx25-0.9.2.1 containing all of the files and subdirectories for the strx25 package.

Configuration

To configure and install the tar ball, See Configuring the Tar Ball.

7.2.8 Downloading from CVS

If you are a subscriber or sponsor of The OpenSS7 Project with CVS archive access privileges then you can download release, mid-release or release candidate versions of the strx25 package from the project CVS archive.

The OpenSS7 X.25 Networking package is located in the strx25 module of /var/cvs. For release tag information, see Releases.

To access the archive from the project CVS pserver, use the following commands to check out a version from the archive:

     % export CVSROOT='-d:pserver:username@cvs.openss7.com:2401/var/cvs'
     % cvs login
     Password: *********
     % cvs co -r strx25_0.9.2.1 strx25
     % cvs logout

It is, of course, possible to check out by date or by other criteria. For more information, see cvs(1).

Preparing the CVS Working Directory

Although public releases of the strx25 package do not require reconfiguration, creating a configurable directory from the CVS archive requires tools not normally distributed with the other releases.

The build host requires the following GNU tools:

  • m4 1.4.12
  • autoconf 2.63
  • automake 1.10.1
  • libtool 2.2.4
  • gettext 0.17
  • flex 2.5.33
  • bison 2.3

Most desktop development GNU/Linux distributions wil have these tools; however, some non-development or server-style installations might not and they must be installed separately.53

Also, these tools can be acquired from the FSF website in the free software directory, and also at the following locations:

It should be stressed that, in particular, the autoconf(1), and automake(1), must be at version releases 2.63 and 1.10.1. The versions normally distributed in some mainstream GNU/Linux distributions are, in fact, much older than these versions.54 GNU version of these packages configured and installed to default directories will install in /usr/local/ allowing them to coexist with distribution installed versions.

For building documentation, the build host also requires the following documentation tools:

  • gs 6.51 or ghostscript 6.51, or newer.
  • tetex 3.0 or texlive 2007, or newer.
  • texinfo 4.13a or newer.
  • transfig 3.2.3d or newer.
  • imagemagick 5.3.8 or ImageMagick 5.3.8, or newer.
  • groff 1.17.2 or newer.
  • gnuplot 3.7 or newer.
  • latex2html 1.62 or newer.

Most desktop GNU/Linux distributions will have these tools; however, some server-style installations (e.g. Ubuntu-server, SLES 9 or Fedora 6 or 7) will not and they must be installed separately.55

Note that texinfo 4.12 must not be used as it breaks the build process.

For uncooked manual pages, the entire groff(1) package is required on older Debian and Ubuntu systems (the base package did not include grefer(1) which is used extensively by uncooked manual pages). The following will get what you need on older systems:

     Debian: % apt-get install groff_ext
     Ubuntu: % apt-get install groff

On newer systems, simply:

     % apt-get install groff

In addition, the build host requires a complete tool chain for compiling for the target host, including kernel tools such as genksyms(8) and others.

If you wish to package rpms on an rpm(1) system, or debs on a dpkg(1) system, you will need the appropriate tool chain. Systems based on rpm(1) typically have the necessary tool chain available, however, dpkg(1) systems do not. The following on a Debian or Ubuntu system will get what you need:

     % apt-get install debhelper
     % apt-get install fakeroot

To generate a configuration script and the necessary scriptlets required by the GNU autoconf(1) system, execute the following commands on the working directory:

     % autoreconf -fiv strx25

where, strx25 is the name of the directory to where the working copy was checked out under the previous step. This command generates the configure script and other missing pieces that are normally distributed with the release Tar Balls, SRPMs and DSCs.

Make sure that ‘autoreconf --version’ returns ‘2.63’. Otherwise, you may need to perform something like the following:

     % PATH="/usr/local/bin:$PATH"
     % autoreconf -fiv strx25

After reconfiguring the directory, the package can then be configured and built using the same instructions as are used for the Tar Ball, see Configuring the Tar Ball, and Building from the Tar Ball.

Do note, however, that make(1) will rebuild the documentation that is normally released with the package. Additional tools may be necessary for building the documentation. To avoid building and installing the documentation, use the --disable-devel or --disable-docs option to configure described in Configuring the Tar Ball.

When configuring the package in a working directory and while working a change-compile-test cycle that involves configuration macros or documentation, I find it of great advantage to invoke the GNU configure options --enable-maintainer-mode, --enable-dependency-tracking and --disable-devel. The first of these three options will add maintainer-specific targets to any generated Makefile, the second option will invoke automatic dependency tracking within the Makefile so rebuilds after changes to macro, source or documentation files will be automatically rebuilt; and the last option will suppress rebuilding and reinstalling documentation manual pages and header files. Header files will still be available under the /usr/src directory.

7.3 Configuration

7.3.1 Configuring the Binary RPM

In general the binary RPM do not require any configuration, however, during installation it is possible to relocate some of the installation directories. This allows some degree of customization. Relocations that are available on the binary RPM are as follows:

strx25-LiS-core-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
strx25-streams-core-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
/lib/modules/2.4.20-28.7
This relocatable directory contains the kernel modules that provide the strx25 STREAMS core, drivers and modules.56

strx25-LiS-info-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
strx25-streams-info-2.4.20-28.7-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
/usr/include/strx25/2.4.20-28.7
This relocatable directory contains the kernel module exported symbol information that allows other kernel modules to be compiled against the correct version of the strx25 package.57

strx25-dev-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
(not relocatable)
strx25-devel-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
/usr/lib
This relocatable directory contains strx25 libraries.
/usr/include/strx25
This relocatable directory contains strx25 header files.

strx25-doc-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
/usr/share/doc
This relocatable directory contains all package specific documentation (including this manual). The subdirectory in this directory is the strx25-0.9.2.1 directory.
/usr/share/info
This relocatable directory contains info files (including the info version of this manual).
/usr/share/man
This relocatable directory contains manual pages.

strx25-LiS-lib-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
strx25-streams-lib-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
/usr/lib
This relocatable directory contains the run-time shared libraries necessary to run applications programs and utilities developed for OpenSS7 X.25 Networking.
/usr/share/locale
This relocatable directory contains the locale information for shared library files.

strx25-source-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
/usr/src
This relocatable directory contains the source code.

strx25-LiS-util-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
strx25-streams-util-0.9.2.1-1.7.2.i686.rpm
/usr/bin
This relocatable directory contains binary programs and utilities.
/usr/sbin
This relocatable directory contains system binary programs and utilities.
/usr/libexec
This relocatable directory contains test programs.
/etc
This relocatable directory contains init scripts and configuration information.
Installation

To install the binary RPM, See Installing the Binary RPM.

7.3.2 Configuring the Debian DEB

In general the binary DEB do not require any configuration.

Installation

To install the Debian DEB, See Installing the Debian DEB.

7.3.3 Configuring the Source RPM

When building from the source RPM (see Building from the Source RPM), the rebuild process uses a number of macros from the user's .rpmmacros file as described in rpm(8).

Following is an example of the ~/.rpmmacros file that I use for rebuilding RPMS:

     #
     # RPM macros for building rpms
     #
     
     %vendor OpenSS7 Corporation
     %distribution OpenSS7
     %disturl http://www.openss7.org/
     %packager Brian Bidulock <bidulock@openss7.org>
     %url http://www.openss7.org/
     
     %_signature gpg
     %_gpg_path /home/brian/.gnupg
     %_gpg_name openss7@openss7.org
     %_gpgbin /usr/bin/gpg
     
     %_source_payload w9.bzdio
     %_binary_payload w9.bzdio
     
     %_unpackaged_files_terminate_build 1
     %_missing_doc_files_terminate_build 1
     %_use_internal_dependency_generator 0
     %_repackage_all_erasures 0
     %_rollback_transaction_on_failure 0
     
     %configure2_5x %configure
     %make make
     

When building from the source RPM (see Building from the Source RPM), it is possible to pass a number of additional configuration options to the rpmbuild(1) process.

The additional configuration options are described below.

Note that distributions that use older versions of rpm do not have the --with or --without options defined. To achieve the same effect as:

     --with someparm=somearg

do:

     --define "_with_someparm --with-someparm=somearg"

This is a generic description of common rpmbuild(1) options. Not all rpmbuild(1) options are applicable to all SRPMs. Options that are kernel module specific are only applicable to SRPMs that build kernel modules. STREAMS options are only applicable to SRPMs that provide or require STREAMS.

--define "_kversion $PACKAGE_KVERSION"
Specifies the kernel version other than the running kernel for which to build. If _kversion is not defined when rebuilding, the environment variable PACKAGE_KVERSION is used. If the environment variable PACKAGE_KVERSION is not defined, then the version of the running kernel (i.e. discovered with ‘uname -r’) is used as the target version for kernel-dependent packages. This option can also be defined in an .rpmspec file using the macro name ‘_kversion’.
--with checks
--without checks
Enable or disable preinstall checks. Each packages supports a number of preinstall checks that can be performed by invoking the ‘check’ target with automake(1). These currently consist of checking each kernel module for unresolved kernel symbols, checking for documentation for exported kernel module symbols, checking for documentation for exported library symbols, checking for standard options for build and installable programs, checking for documentation for built and installable programs. Normally these checks are only run in maintainer mode, but can be enabled and disabled with this option.
--with k-optimize=HOW
--without k-optimize
Specify ‘HOW’ optimization, normal, size, speed or quick. size compiles kernel modules -Os, speed compiles kernel modules -O3, and quick compiles kernel modules -O0. The default is normal. Use with care.
--with cooked-manpages
--without cooked-manpages
Some systems do not like grefer(1) references in manual pages.58 This option will cook soelim(1), refer(1), tbl(1) and pic(1) commands from the manual pages and also strip groff(1) comments. The default is to leave manual pages uncooked: they are actually smaller that way.
--with public
--without public
Release public packages or private packages. This option has no effect on the strx25 package. The default is to release public packages.
--with k-debug
--without k-debug
Specifies whether kernel debugging is to be performed on the build kernel modules. Mutually exclusive with test and safe below. This has the effect of removing static and inline attributes from functions and invoking all debugging macros in the code. The default is to not perform kernel debugging.
--with k-test
--without k-test
Specifies whether kernel testing is to be performed. Mutually exclusive with debug above and safe below. This has the effect of removing static and inline attributes from functions and invoking most debugging macros in the code. The default is to not perform kernel testing.
--with k-safe
--without k-safe
Specifies whether kernel saftey is to be performed. Mutually exclusive with debug and test above. This has the effect of invoking some more pedantic assertion macros in the code. The default is not to apply kernel safety.
--with k-inline
--without k-inline
Specifies whether kernel inline functions are to be placed inline. This has the effect of adding the -finline-functions flag to CFLAGS for compiling kernel modules. Linux 2.4 kernels are normally compiled -O2 which does not respect the inline directive. This compiles kernel modules with -finline-functions to get closer to -O3 optimization. For better optimization controls, See Configuring the Tar Ball.
--with k-modversions
--without k-modversions
Specifies whether kernel symbol versions are to be applied to symbols exported by package kernel modules. The default is to version exported module symbols. This package does not export symbols so this option has no effect.
--with devfs
--without devfs
Specifies whether the build is for a device file system daemon enabled system with autoloading, or not. The default is to build for devfsd(1) autoloading when CONFIG_DEVFS_FS is defined in the target kernel. The ‘rebuild’ target uses this option to signal to the RPM spec file that the ‘dev’ subpackage need not be built. This option does not appear when the package has no devices.
--with devel
--without devel
Specifies whether to build development environment packages such as those that include header files, static libraries, manual pages and texinfo(1) documentation. The default is to build development environment packages. This option can be useful when building for an embedded target where only the runtime components are desired.
--with docs
--without docs
Specifies whether to build and install major documentation such manual pages and texinfo(1) documentation. The default is to build and install documentation. This option can be useful when building for an embedded target where only the runtime and static compile components are desired, but not major documentation. This option does not override the setting of --without devel.
--with tools
--without tools
Specifies whether user space packages are to be built. The default is to build user space packages. This option can be useful when rebuilding for multiple architectures and target kernels. The ‘rebuildautomake(1) target uses this feature when rebuilding for all available architectures and kernels, to rebuild user packages once per architecture instead of once per kernel.
--with modules
--without modules
Specifies whether kernel modules packages are to be built. The default is to build kernel module packages. This option can be useful when rebuilding for multiple architectures and target kernels. The ‘rebuildautomake(1) target uses this feature to rebuild for all available architectures and kernels.
--with lis
--without lis
Specifies that the package is to be rebuilt against Linux STREAMS. The default is to automatically identify whether LiS or streams is loaded on the build system and build accordingly.
--with lfs
--without lfs
Specifies that the package is to be rebuilt against Linux Fast-STREAMS. The default is to automatically identify whether LiS or streams is loaded on the build system and build accordingly.

In general, the default values of these options are sufficient for most purposes and no options need be provided when rebuilding the Source RPMs.

Build

To build from the source RPM, See Building from the Source RPM.

7.3.4 Configuring the Debian DSC

The Debian DSC can be configured by passing options in the environment variable BUILD_DEBOPTIONS. The options placed in this variable take the same form as those passed to the configure script, See Configuring the Tar Ball. For an example, See Building from the Debian DSC.

Build

To build from the Debian DSC, See Building from the Debian DSC.

7.3.5 Configuring the Tar Ball

All of the normal GNU autoconf(1) configuration options and environment variables apply. Additional options and environment variables are provided to tailor or customize the build and are described below.

7.3.5.1 Configure Options

This is a generic description of common configure options that are in addition to those provided by autoconf(1), automake(1), libtool(1) and gettext(1).

Not all configure options are applicable to all release packages. Options that are kernel module specific are only applicable to release packages that build kernel modules. STREAMS options are only applicable to release packages that provide or require STREAMS.

Following are the additional configure options, their meaning and use:

--enable-checks
--disable-checks
Enable or disable preinstall checks. Each release package supports a number of preinstall checks that can be performed by invoking the ‘check’ target with make(1). These currently consist of checking each kernel module for unresolved kernel symbols, checking for documentation for exported kernel module symbols, checking for documentation for exported library symbols, checking for standard options for build and installable programs, checking for documentation for built and installable programs. Normally these checks are only run in maintainer mode, but can be enabled and disabled with this option.
--enable-autotest
--disable-autotest
Enable or disable pre- and post-installation testing. Each release package supports a number of autotest test suites that can be performed by invoking the ‘installcheck’ target with make(1). These currently consist of running installed modules, commands and binaries against a number of specific test cases. Normally these checks are only run in maintainer mode, but can be enabled and disabled with this option.
--disable-compress-manpages
Compress manual pages with ‘gzip -9’ or ‘bzip2 -9’ or leave them uncompressed. The default is to compress manual pages with ‘gzip -9’ or ‘bzip2 -9’ if a single compressed manual page exists in the target installation directory (--mandir). This disables automatic compression.
--disable-public
Disable public release. This option is not usable on public releases and only has a usable effect on OpenSS7 X.25 Networking when the package is acquired from CVS. In particular, the STREAMS SS7/VoIP/ISDN/SIGTRAN Stacks (strss7-0.9a.8) release package has a large number of non-public components. Specifying this option will cause the package to build and install all private release components in addition to the public release components. This option affects all release packages. Most release packages do not have private release components.
--disable-initscripts
Disables the installation of init scripts. The default is to configure and install init scripts and their associated configuration files.

Although the default is to install init scripts, installation attempts to detect a System V init script configuration, and if one is not found, the init scripts are installed into the appropriate directories, but the symbolic links to the run level script directories are not generated and the script is not invoked. Therefore, it is safe to leave this option unchanged, even on distributions that do not support System V init script layout.

--disable-32bit-libs
Disables the build and install of 32-bit compatibility libraries and test binaries on 64-bit systems that support 32-bit compatibility. The default is to build and install 32-bit compatibility libraries and test binaries. This option can be usefule when configuring for an embedded target where only native shared libraries and binaries are desired.
--disable-devel
Disables the installation of development environment components such as header files, static libraries, manual pages and texinfo(1) documentation. The default is to install development environment components. This option can be useful when configuring for an embedded target where only the runtime components are desired, or when performing a edit-compile-test cycle.
--disable-docs
Disables the build and installation of major documentation such manual pages and texinfo(1) documentation. The default is to build and install documentation. This option can be useful when building for an embedded target where only the runtime and static compile components are desired, but not major documentation. This option does not override the setting of --disable-devel.
--enable-tools
Specifies whether user space programs and libraries are to be built and installed. The default is to build and install user space programs and libraries. This option can be useful when rebuilding for multiple architectures and target kernels, particularly under rpm(1) or dpkg(1). The ‘rebuildautomake(1) target uses this feature when rebuilding RPMs for all available architectures and kernels, to rebuild user packages once per architecture instead of once per kernel.
--enable-modules
Specifies whether kernel modules are to be built and installed. The default is to build and install kernel modules. This option can be useful when rebuilding for multiple architectures and target kernels, particularly under rpm(1) or dpkg(1). The ‘rebuildautomake(1) target uses this feature to rebuild for all available architectures and kernels. This option has no effect for release packages that do not provide kernel modules.
--enable-arch
Specifies whether architectural dependent package components are to be built and installed. This option can be useful when rebuilding for multiple architectures and target kernels, particularly under dpkg(1). The default is to configure, build and install architecture dependent package components. This option has no effect for release packages that do not provide architecture dependent components.
--enable-indep
Specifies whether architecture independent package components are to be built and installed. This option can be useful when rebuilding for multiple architectures and target kernels, particularly under dpkg(1). The default is to configure, build and install architecture independent package components. This options has no effect for release packages that do not provide architecture independent components.
--enable-k-inline
Enable kernel inline functions. Most Linux kernels build without -finline-functions. This option adds the -finline-functions and -Winline flags to the compilation of kernel modules. Use with care. This option has no effect for release packages that do not provide kernel modules.
--enable-k-safe
Enable kernel module run-time safety checks. Specifies whether kernel safety is to be performed. This option is mutually exclusive with --enable-k-test and --enable-k-debug below. This has the effect of invoking some more pedantic assertion macros in the code. The default is not to apply kernel safety. This option has no effect for release packages that have are no kernel modules.
--enable-k-test
Enable kernel module run-time testing. Specifies whether kernel testing is to be performed. This option is mutually exclusive with --enable-k-safe above and --enable-k-debug below. This has the effect of remove static and inline attributes from functions and invoking most non-performance affecting debugging macros in the code. The default is not to perform kernel testing. This option has no effect for release packages that do not provide kernel modules.
--enable-k-debug
Enable kernel module run-time debugging. Specifies whether kernel debugging is to be performed. This option is mutually exclusive with --enable-k-safe and --enable-k-test above. This has the effect of removing static and inline attributes from functions and invoking all debugging macros in the code (including performance-affecting debug macros). The default is to not perform kernel debugging. This option has no effect for release packages that do not provide kernel modules.
--disable-k-modversions
Disable module versions on strx25 symbols. Specifies whether kernel symbol versions are to be used on symbols exported from built strx25 modules. The default is to provide kernel symbol versions on all exported symbols. This option has no effect for release packages that do not provide kernel modules.
--enable-devfs
--disable-devfs
Specifies whether the build is for a device file system daemon enabled system with autoloading, or not. The default is to build for devfsd(8) autoloading when CONFIG_DEVFS_FS is defined in the target kernel. The ‘reuildautomake(1) target uses this option to signal to the RPM spec file that the ‘dev’ subpackage need not be built. This option has no effect for release packages that do not provide devices.
--with-gpg-user=GNUPGUSER
Specify the gpg(1)GNUPGUSER’ for signing RPMs and tarballs. The default is the content of the environment variable GNUPGUSER. If unspecified, the gpg(1) program will normally use the user name of the account invoking the gpg(1) program. For building source RPMs, the RPM macro ‘_gpg_name’ will override this setting.
--with-gpg-home=GNUPGHOME
Specify the ‘GNUPGHOME’ directory for signing RPMs and tarballs. The default is the user's ~/.gpg directory. For building source RPMs, the RPM macro ‘_gpg_path’ will override this setting.
--with-pkg-epoch=EPOCH
Specifies the epoch for the package. This is neither used for rpm(1) nor dpkg(1) packages, it applies to the tarball release as a whole. The default is the contents of the .pkgepoch file in the release package source directory or, if that file does not exist, zero (0).
--with-pkg-release=RELEASE
Specifies the release for the package. This is neither used for rpm(1) nor dpkg(1) packages, it applies to the tarball release as a whole. The default is the contents of the .pkgrelease file in the release package source directory or, if that file does not exist, one (1). This is the number after the last point in the package version number.
--with-pkg-distdir=DIR
Specifies the distribution directory for the package. This is used by the maintainer for building distributions of tarballs. This is the directory into which archives are copied for distribution. The default is the top build directory.
--with-cooked-manpages
Convert manual pages to remove macro dependencies and grefer(1) references. Some systems do not like grefer(1) references in manual pages.59 This option will cook soelim(1), refer(1), tbl(1) and pic(1) commands from the manual pages and also strip groff(1) comments. The default is to leave manual pages uncooked (they are actually smaller that way).
--with-rpm-epoch=PACKAGE_EPOCH
Specify the ‘PACKAGE_EPOCH’ for the RPM spec file. The default is to use the RPM epoch contained in the release package file .rpmepoch.
--with-rpm-release=PACKAGE_RPMRELEASE
Specify the ‘PACKAGE_RPMRELEASE’ for the RPM spec file. The default is to use the RPM release contained in the release package file .rpmrelease.
--with-rpm-extra=PACKAGE_RPMEXTRA
Specify the ‘PACKAGE_RPMEXTRA’ extra release information for the RPM spec file. The default is to use the RPM extra release information contained in the release package file .rpmextra. Otherwise, this value will be determined from automatic detection of the RPM distribution.
--with-rpm-topdir=PACKAGE_RPMTOPDIR
Specify the ‘PACKAGE_RPMTOPDIR’ top directory for RPMs. If specified with a null ‘PACKAGE_RPMTOPDIR’, the default directory for the RPM distribution will be used. If this option is not provided on the command line, the top build directory will be used as the RPM top directory as well.
--with-deb-epoch=EPOCH
Specify the ‘PACKAGE_DEBEPOCH’ for the DEB control file. The default is to use the DEB epoch contained in the release package file .debepoch.
--with-deb-release=RELEASE
Specify the ‘PACKAGE_DEBRELEASE’ for the DEB control file. The default is to use the DEB release contained in the release package file .debrelease.
--with-deb-topdir=DIR
Specify the ‘PACKAGE_DEBTOPDIR’ top directory for DEBs. If specified with a null ‘PACKAGE_DEBTOPDIR’, the default directory for the DEB distribution will be used. If this option is not provided on the command line, the top build directory will be used as the DEB top directory as well.
--with-k-release=PACKAGE_KRELEASE
Specify the ‘PACKAGE_KRELEASE’ release of the Linux kernel for which the build is targeted. When not cross compiling, if this option is not set, the build will be targeted at the kernel running in the build environment (e.g., ‘uname -r’). When cross-compiling this option must be specified or the configure script will generate an error and terminate.
--with-k-linkage=PACKAGE_KLINKAGE
Specify the ‘PACKAGE_KLINKAGE’ for kernel module linkage. This can be one of the following:
  • loadable’ – loadable kernel modules
  • linkable’ – linkable kernel objects
The default is to build loadable kernel modules.
--with-k-modules=K-MODULES-DIR
Specify the ‘K-MODULES-DIR’ directory to which kernel modules will be installed. The default is based on the option --with-k-release, --with-k-prefix and --with-k-rootdir. The default is DESTDIR/K-MODULES-DIR which is typically DESTDIR/lib/modules/PACKAGE_KRELEASE/. This directory is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message.
--with-k-build=K-BUILD-DIR
Specify the ‘K-BUILD-DIR’ base kernel build directory in which configured kernel source resides. The default is DESTDIR/K-MODULES-DIR/build. This directory is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message.
--with-k-source=K-SOURCE-DIR
Specify the ‘K-SOURCE-DIR’ base kernel build directory in which configured kernel source resides. The default is DESTDIR/K-MODULES-DIR/source. This directory is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message.
--with-k-modver=K-MODVER-FILE
Specify the ‘K-MODVER-FILE’ kernel module versions file. The default is K-BUILD-DIR/Module.symvers. This file is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message.
--with-k-sysmap=K-SYSMAP-FILE
Specify the ‘K-SYSMAP-FILE’ kernel system map file. The default is K-BUILD-DIR/System.map. This file is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message.
--with-k-archdir=K-ARCHDIR
Specify the ‘K-ARCHDIR’ kernel source architecture specific directory. The default is DESTDIR/K-SOURCE-DIR/arch. This directory is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message.
--with-k-machdir=K-MACHDIR
Specify the ‘K-MACHDIR’ kernel source machine specific directory. The default is DESTDIR/K-SOURCE-DIR/target_cpu. This directory is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message.
--with-k-config=K-CONFIG
Specify the ‘K-CONFIG’ kernel configuration file. The default is BOOT/config-K-RELEASE. This configuration file is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message.
--with-k-optimize=HOW
--without-k-optimize
Specify ‘HOW’ optimization, normal, size, speed or quick. size compiles kernel modules -Os, speed compiles kernel modules -O3, and quick compiles kernel modules -O0. The default is normal. Use with care. The most common use of this option is to specify --with-k-optimize=speed --disable-k-safe to compile for maximum performance. Nevertheless, even these setting are ricing and the resulting kernel modules will only be about 5% faster.
--with-lis[=LIS-DIR]
--without-lis
Specify the ‘LIS-DIR’ directory in which to find LiS headers. Also specifies that the build is to be made against Linux STREAMS. The default is /usr/include/LiS if it exists, ‘no’ otherwise. This directory is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message. This option has no effect on release packages that do not use the STREAMS subsystem.
--with-lfs[=LFS-DIR]
--without-lfs
Specify the ‘LFS-DIR’ directory in which to find LfS headers. Also specifies that the build is to be made against Linux Fast-STREAMS. The default is /usr/include/streams if it exists, ‘no’ otherwise. This directory is normally located by the configure script and need only be provided for special cross-build environments or when requested by a configure script error message. This option has no effect on release packages that do not use the STREAMS subsystem.
--with-strconf-master=STRCONF_CONFIG
Specify the ‘STRCONF_CONFIG’ file name to which the configuration master file is written. The default is Config.master. This option has no effect on release packages that do not use the STREAMS subsystem and the strconf scripts. This option should not be specified when configuring the master package as the setting for all add-on packages will conflict.
--with-base-major=STRCONF_MAJBASE
Start numbering for major devices at ‘STRCONF_MAJBASE’. The default is ‘230’. This option has no effect on release packages that do not use the STREAMS subsystem and the strconf scripts. This option should not be specified when configuring the master package as the setting for all add-on packages will conflict.

7.3.5.2 Environment Variables

Following are additional environment variables to configure, their meaning and use:

GPG
GPG signature command. This is used for signing distributions by the maintainer. By default, configure will search for this tool.
GNUPGUSER
GPG user name. This is used for signing distributions by the maintainer.
GNUPGHOME
GPG home directory. This is used for signing distributions by the maintainer.
GPGPASSWD
GPG password for signing. This is used for signing distributions by the maintainer. This environment variable is not maintained by the configure script and should only be used on an isolated system.
SOELIM
Roff source elimination command, soelim(1). This is only necessary when the option --with-cooked-manpages has been specified and configure cannot find the proper soelim(1) command. By default, configure will search for this tool.
REFER
Roff references command, refer(1). This is only necessary when the option --with-cooked-manpages has been specified and configure cannot find the proper refer(1) command. By default, configure will search for this tool.
TBL
Roff table command, tbl(1). This is only necessary when the option --with-cooked-manpages has been specified and configure cannot find the proper tbl(1) command. By default, configure will search for this tool.
PIC
Roff picture command, pic(1). This is only necessary when the option --with-cooked-manpages has been specified and configure cannot find the proper pic(1) command. By default, configure will search for this tool.
GZIP
Default compression options provided to GZIP_CMD.
GZIP_CMD
Manpages (and kernel modules) compression commands, gzip(1). This is only necessary when the option --without-compressed-manpages has not been specified and configure cannot find the proper gzip(1) command. By default, configure will search for this tool.
BZIP2
Default compression options provided to BZIP2_CMD
BZIP2_CMD
Manpages compression commands, bzip2(1). This is only necessary when the option --without-compressed-manpages has not been specified and configure cannot find the proper bzip2(1) command. By default, configure will search for this tool.
MAKEWHATIS
Manpages apropros database rebuild command, makewhatis(8). By default, configure will search for this tool. By default, configure will search for this tool.
CHKCONFIG
Chkconfig command, chkconfig(8). This was used for installation of init scripts. All packages now come with init_install(8) and init_remove(8) scripts used to install and remove init scripts on both RPM and Debian systems.
RPM
Rpm command, rpm(1). This is only necessary for RPM builds. By default, configure will search for this tool.
RPMBUILD
Build RPM command, rpmbuild(1). This is only necessary for RPM builds. By default, configure will search for this tool. rpm(1) will be used instead of rpmbuild(1) only if rpmbuild(1) cannot be found.
DPKG
Dpkg comand, dpkg(1). This command is used for building Debian packages. By default, configure will search for this tool.
DPKG_SOURCE
Dpkg-source command, dpkg-source(1). This command is used for building Debian dsc packages. By default, configure will search for this tool.
DPKG_BUILDPACKAGE
Dpkg-buildpackage command, dpkg-buildpackage(1). This command is used for building Debian deb packages. By default, configure will search for this tool.
DEB_BUILD_ARCH
Debian build architecture. This variable is used for building Debian packages. The default is the autoconf build architecture.
DEB_BUILD_GNU_CPU
Debian build cpu. This variable is used for building Debian packages. The default is the autoconf build cpu.
DEB_BUILD_GNU_SYSTEM
Debian build os. This variable is used for building Debian packages. The default is the autoconf build os.
DEB_BUILD_GNU_TYPE
Debian build alias. This variable is used for building Debian packages. The default is the autoconf build alias.
DEB_HOST_ARCH
Debian host architecture. This variable is used for building Debian packages. The default is the autoconf host architecture.
DEB_HOST_GNU_CPU
Debian host cpu. This variable is used for building Debian packages. The default is the autoconf host cpu.
DEB_HOST_GNU_SYSTEM
Debian host os. This variable is used for building Debian packages. The default is the autoconf host os.
DEB_HOST_GNU_TYPE
Debian host alias. This variable is used for building Debian packages. The default is the autoconf host alias.
LDCONFIG
Configure loader command, ldconfig(8). Command used to configure the loader when libraries are installed. By default, configure will search for this tool.
DESTDIR
Cross build root directory. Specifies the root directory for build and installation.
DEPMOD
Build kernel module dependencies command, depmod(8). This is used during installation of kernel modules to a running kernel to rebuild the modules dependency database. By default, configure will search for this tool.
MODPROBE
Probe kernel module dependencies command, modprobe(8). This is used during installation of kernel modules to a running kernel to remove old modules. By default, configure will search for this tool.
LSMOD
List kernel modules command, lsmod(8). This is used during installation of kernel modules to a running kernel to detect old modules for removal. By default, configure will search for this tool.
LSOF
List open files command, lsof(1). This is used during installation of kernel modules to a running kernel to detect old modules for removal. Processes owning the old kernel modules will be killed and the module removed. If the process restarts, the new module will be demand loaded. By default, configure will search for this tool.
GENKSYMS
Generate kernel symbols command, genksyms(8). This is used for generating module symbol versions during build. By default, configure will search for this tool.
KGENKSYMS
Linux 2.6 generate kernel symbols command, genksyms(8). This is used for generating module symbol version during build. By default, configure will search for this tool.
OBJDUMP
Object dumping command, objdump(1). This is used for listing information about object files. By default, configure will search for this tool.
NM
Object symbol listing command, nm(1). This is used for listing information about object files. By default, configure will search for this tool.
MODPOST_CACHE
Cache file for modpost(1). The version of the modpost.sh script that ships with each package can cache information to a cache file to speed multiple builds. This environment variable is used to specify a cache file.
AUTOM4TE
Autom4te command, autom4te(1). This is the executable used by autotest for pre- and post-installation checks. By default, configure will search for this tool.
AUTOTEST
Autotest macro build command, autom4te(1). This is the executable used by autotest for pre- and post-installation checks. By default, configure will search for this tool.
7.3.5.3 Build

To build from the tar ball, See Building from the Tar Ball.

7.4 Building

7.4.1 Building from the Source RPM

If you have downloaded the necessary source RPM (see Downloading the Source RPM), then the following instructions will rebuild the binary RPMs on your system. Once the binary RPMs are rebuilt, you may install them as described above (see Installing the Binary RPM).

The source RPM is rebuilt to binary RPMs as follows:

     % wget http://www.openss7.org/rpms/SRPMS/strx25-0.9.2.1-1.src.rpm
     % rpmbuild --rebuild -vv strx25-0.9.2.1-1.src.rpm

The rebuild process can also recognize a number of options that can be used to tweak the resulting binaries, See Configuring the Source RPM. These options are provided on the rpm(1) command line. For example:

     % rpmbuild --rebuild -vv --target athlon-redhat-linux \
       --define "_kversion 2.4.20-28.7" \
       --with lfs -- strx25-0.9.2.1-1.src.rpm

will rebuild binary RPM for the ‘2.4.20-28.7’ kernel for the ‘athlon’ architecture against the Linux Fast-STREAMS STREAMS package. 60

Installation

To install the resulting binary RPM, See Installing the Binary RPM.

7.4.2 Building from the Debian DSC

If you have downloaded the necessary Debian DSC (see Downloading the Debian DSC), then the following instructions will rebuild the binary DEBs on your system. Once the binary DEBs are rebuilt, you may install them as described above (see Installing the Debian DEB).

The Debian DSC is rebuilt to binary DEBs as follows:

     % wget http://www.openss7.org/debian/strx25_0.9.2.1-0.dsc
     % wget http://www.openss7.org/debian/strx25_0.9.2.1-0.tar.gz
     % dpkg-buildpackage -v strx25_0.9.2.1-0.dsc

The rebuild process can also recognize a number of options that can be used to tweak the resulting binaries, See Configuring the Debian DSC. These options are provided in the environment variable BUILD_DPKGOPTIONS and have the same form as the options to configure, See Configuring the Tar Ball. For example:

     % BUILD_DEBOPTIONS='
             --with-lfs
             --with-k-release=2.4.20-28.7
             --host=athlon-debian-